BEL

(redirected from beaux)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

BEL

GOST 7.67 Latin three-letter geocode for Belgium. The code is used for transactions to and from Belgian bank accounts and for international shipping to Belgium. As with all GOST 7.67 codes, it is used primarily in Cyrillic alphabets.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Founded in 2016, Indigo Beaux is a subscription box service based in Florida, offering luxurious, hard-to-find beauty, skincare, and relaxation products from shops and brands around the world with each monthly shipment.
For more information, visit Indigo Beaux online at http://www.indigobeaux.com, on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/indigobeaux, and on Instagram at @indigobeaux.
The house belongs to the Second Empire subdivision of the Beaux Arts school, meaning it features the motifs of French architecture during the reign of Napoleon III (1852-1870).
In fact, the largest building under one roof in the entire country (not counting the very Beaux Arts Pentagon) is done in the Second Empire style: the Ohio State Asylum for the Insane in Columbus.
The great Beaux Arts architects, such as Stanford White and Richard Morris Hunt, were also superb decorators, certainly in league with the best who ever lived.
The name Beaux Arts, meaning "fine arts," comes from the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris, where most of these architects studied.
By 1892 Beaux was at the height of her powers; she recently had returned from studying in Europe, and news of her success in New York with the portrait of her nephew, Cecil Kent Drinker (1891; Fig.
In her catalogue essay, "The Queen Stands Alone," Nina Auerbach attributes some aspects of Beaux's works to her unusual upbringing.
Generally, in her paintings of children Beaux captures their loveliness and youth as well as their discomforts and squirminess.
While Parks's contention that "Old Beaux and Young Beaux" is a companion piece to "Flirts" seems logical because of their similarities, the narrative structure of "My Daughter's Admirers" puts the unpublished essay in a totally different context.
Mur-free's talent for establishing narrative credibility has significantly improved by her next and last published satire, "My Daughter's Admirers." In this satire, Murfree's narrator is James Archer, a wealthy father who frets and catalogs the variety of beaux afflicting his home.
Murfree's progression from "Flirts and Their Ways" to "My Daughter's Admirers" suggests a rapid development of narrative skills, and perhaps this is why "Old Beaux and Young Beaux" was set aside.