bear market


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to bear market: bull market

Bear market

Any market in which prices exhibit a declining trend. For a prolonged period, usually falling by 20% or more.

Bear Market

A situation in which a large number of indices lose a significant percentage of their value over the medium or long term. While there is no hard-and-fast definition of a bear market, many analysts consider a 20% loss in the Dow Jones Industrial Average or the S&P 500 to be a good rule of thumb. It is difficult to make a positive return on stocks during a bear market, and some investors move into bonds. This leads to the sale of more stocks, and the bear market can become self-sustaining. Technical analysts attempt to find the bottom of bear markets and identify buy signals, but this is risky. A bear market is different from a recession, but one can lead to the other. See also: Bull market.

bear market

An extended period of general price declines in an individual security or other asset, such as silver or real estate; a group of securities; or the securities market as a whole. Nevertheless, even during widespread bear markets, it is possible to have bull markets in particular stocks or groups of stocks. For example, stocks of gold-related companies often move against major trends in the security markets. Compare bull market.

Bear market.

A bear market is sometimes described as a period of falling securities prices and sometimes, more specifically, as a market where prices have fallen 20% or more from the most recent high.

A bear market in stocks is triggered when investors sell off shares, generally because they anticipate worsening economic conditions and falling corporate profits.

A bear market in bonds is usually the result of rising interest rates, which prompts investors to sell off older bonds paying lower rates.

bear market

a situation in which the prices of FINANCIAL SECURITIES (stocks, shares, etc.) or COMMODITIES (tin, wheat, etc.) tend to fall as a result of persistent selling and only limited buying. See SPECULATION. Compare BULL MARKET.

bear market

a situation where the prices of FINANCIAL SECURITIES (stocks, shares, etc.) or COMMODITIES (tin, wheat, etc.) are tending to fall as a result of persistent selling and only limited buying. See SPECULATOR. Compare BULL MARKET.
References in periodicals archive ?
And in 1990, the bear market was set off by Iraq's invasion of Kuwait.
Yes, beta is very important in a bear market or any market when explaining relative performance, but so is value.
24 market close, all three indexes were in correction mode as opposed to bear market territory.
Stovall says all asset classes, except Treasuries, decline in a bear market, although consumer staples, health care, utilities and energy have outperformed the benchmark 82% of the time.
His interpretation of the Dow Theory did a better job of navigating the 2007-2009 bear market and subsequent bull market than any of the nearly 200 other stock market timing strategies monitored by the Hulbert Financial Digest.
The damage to stock prices was so great from the Showa Bear Market that it took roughly 10 years after the initial bottom and a "modest" 2-year bounce of 2.
Financial planners are well positioned for this kind of work, he said, and the bear market might have prompted them to take a second look at payout annuities.
The onslaught of the 2000 bear market presented some financial planners with their first opportunity to test their skills--both investment and client management.
The defense in a bear market is to build a diverse portfolio of value and growth mutual funds, individual stocks, and bonds, and to keep your cash in a high-yield money market," explains Richmond Heights, California-based financial advisor Joyce Muse-Harris.
The Dow danced with an official bear market Thursday after finishing just shy of a 20 percent loss since the index's record high last year.
A review of the worst bear markets of the last 100 years and an explanation of the common technical and sentiment indicators that highlighted the end of each bear market;
Because 412(i) plans are funded exclusively with insurance company contracts--either annuities or annuities and life insurance--the funds within the plans are protected against negative returns, bear markets and poor investment judgement, according to Michael Schulitz, a Lincoln assistant vice president.