Batting Average

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Batting Average

A slang term in business for one's success rate. For example, a salesman making cold calls has a solid batting average if half of his potential clients agree to purchase his products. The term is derived from baseball.
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Data for 2013-17 show that team batting averages tend to rise over the first half of the season for MLB as a whole (Figure 4).
If one takes account only of hits and batting average, then indeed "hitless wonders" is an appropriate appellation for Chicago's White Sox of those years.
To understand this, you need to consider the retailer's batting average.
However, both the U15 and U19 BA batting averages were significantly worse than those of W batsmen in every year.
THERE is an Indian cricket player who many consider a legend, next only to Sir Don Bradman as a batsman - though his Test batting average hovers around 55 against Bradman's 99.94.
The fact is that the league batting average has remained remarkably stable throughout the history of professional baseball.
Oregon State owns a 43-14 record, a .286 team batting average, the program's highest since joining the Pac-10 in 1987, and is armed with junior right-handed pitcher Brianne McGowan, 29-7 this season with 249 strikeouts in 252 1/3 innings and a 1.30 earned run average.
By 1996, NCAA Division I-wide records were set for batting averages, home runs and earned run averages, prompting stricter standards in the construction of aluminum bats.
The 32-yearold, who topped his side's batting averages in the 2003 title-winning squad, is expected to sign under the `Kolpak' ruling where cricketers from countries associated with the European Union are not deemed overseas players.
The Carlton and Saltires star topped the Scottish National Cricket League batting averages for 2004.
Dedicated little leaguers and major leaguers alike have seen their batting averages jump markedly after practicing with Actor's creation.
Gould (1996) believes that if hitters have improved, then the variance around annual mean batting averages must be systematically decreasing over time.