Balance

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Account Balance

The amount available in an account. Simply put, the account balance is the net of all credits less all debits. A positive account balance indicates the account holder has funds available to him/her, while a negative balance indicates the holder owes money. Account balances are important in banking because they determine whether or not an account holder has money for living expenses and in margin accounts because they show whether the holder can conduct more margin transactions.

Balance

The amount of the original loan remaining to be paid.

It is equal to the loan amount less the sum of all prior payments of principal.

References in periodicals archive ?
Ultimately it does not pro vide for the balance of conditions that would allow for balanced part formation.
In any case, balanced or not, these arc wines a particular wine drinker may decide to pass on.
As a class, discuss the different forces that an athlete would need to counter in order to stay balanced. For instance, which forces push against the athlete and how would he or she adjust the body to balance the forces?
McMahan calls the Balanced Scorecard a "living, breathing document that is constantly changing....
More specifically, Hackett argues that balanced scorecards should focus on a mix of internal and external measures.
For the IDC Balanced Rating, SPECfp-rate-base2000, SPECint-rate-base2000 and Linpack Rmax results are used in the rating.
One major strength of Niven's style is that there are plenty of suggestions and examples provided throughout, including help with one of the most difficult aspects--selecting appropriate performance measures for the four areas of the balanced scorecard: financial, customer, internal business process, and learning and growth.
Several large light-colored flowers on one side of an arrangement can be balanced by just one small, yet darker or brighter flower on the other side.
The reality has been that the Balanced Budget Act's restrictions on long-term care have created more hardship and fewer savings than many congressmen anticipated.
The Balanced Scorecard is different from typical executive information systems because it also targets leading indicators to give executives a forward-looking approach to analyzing a company's health.
Enrollment in Medicare managed care plans will exceed 20 percent by the end of 1999 as a result of Medicare reforms in the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, according to Howard Veit, Managing Principal for Towers Perrin's health industry consulting practice.
The mutual fund industry's answer for jittery investors like yourself has been a type of hybrid investment called either balanced funds or asset allocation funds.