backlog

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Backlog

The total value of orders for a product that have not been filled. The backlog can help a company estimate its future earnings or other performance more accurately. This metric is used most often in manufacturing.

backlog

a build-up of customer orders which a firm has agreed to deliver at specified future dates. Backlogging is one means by which a firm can ‘even out’ demand in relation to its production capacity, allowing delivery lead times to increase during peaks in demand and shorten during slack periods. Backlogs of orders can provide an alternative to STOCKHOLDING or OVERTIME working, and varying the backlog may be the only way of dealing with demand fluctuations in some service industries. See PRODUCTION SCHEDULING.
References in periodicals archive ?
To help deal with its backlog, Portland applied for and will receive a $2 million federal grant, part of $41 million being allocated to 21 cities, counties and states by the U.S.
"Investment banking revenues should recover from first-quarter levels if the environment is favorable, based on the significant backlog of deals we have pending with our clients," Citigroup Chief Financial Officer John Gerspach told investors after the bank recorded a 27 percent earnings slide in the first quarter.
In the study, Fitch found a low correlation between total IB revenue of the five US GTUBs -- Bank of America, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase and Morgan Stanley -- and the number of those banks citing IB backlog "strength" in the previous quarter's earnings calls.
As processors work off this backlog it has resulted in contractionary values for the backlog component of the Index, thereby lowering the overall Index.
In her weekly radio show, Robredo called out Solicitor General Jose Calida for the more than a million backlog of cases in his office following his participation in the sedition complaint filed by police against her and other critics of the government.
Avoiding the problem by mandating that there will never be a backlog may be ideal in concept, but is unlikely in practice due to the dynamic nature of the insurance industry and unpredictable nature of individuals.
Cessna has firm orders for 300 very light jets and is fully booked into the beginning of 2009, with a backlog worth $6.8 billion.
Jack Stopforth, Liverpool Chamber of Commerce chief executive, said: "It is very damaging to our businesses and also to the future of Royal Mail that we are still suffering the consequences of the backlog caused by the dispute so long after."
The Knight Open Government Survey audit, released by the National Security Archive, an independent non-government research institute located at The George Washington University, found that 200,000 requests are still pending, and some agencies' backlogs actually have increased since Bush signed the order in December 2005.
In September 2009, GAO reported that SSA's backlog reduction plan should help reduce the hearings backlog, but that SSA's ability to eliminate it by the agency's target date of 2013 would require SSA to achieve all of its key workforce and performance goals.
In a critical report, the MPs found the UKBA was "still failing to meet expectations" with delays and backlogs being attributed "at least in part to inadequate decisionmaking in the first instance".
As the often-overused adage states, many are incapable of 'thinking outside of the box.' There is no better example of this than order backlogs. A lot of companies have looked at backlogs as the lifeblood of their business and continue to do so, but excessive backlogs can be poison to a company and eventually lead to its death!