Host Bond

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Host Bond

A bond with a warrant or other sweetener attached. For example, a convertible bond is a host bond because it includes the option to change the bond to stock. A host bond is also called a package or a back bond.
References in periodicals archive ?
As the MOF buys back bonds at their face value rather than market prices, investors may incur losses.
The government had eased liquidity in the markets by buying back bonds through open market operations during the year 2012-13.
After initial bond selling, bond prices moved in a narrow range as investors bought back bonds, deemed safe assets, on persistent worries over the eurozone sovereign debt crisis, brokers said.
M2 EQUITYBITES-December 29, 2010--Banco de Castilla-La Mancha to buy back bonds of Caja de Ahorros de Castilla-La Mancha(C)2010 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.m2.com
DOF Subsea also announced it bought back bonds with nominal value of NOK206.5m in its bond DOFSUB01 with maturity in March 2011, at par.
13 July 2010 - Norwegian offshore vessel operator DOF ASA (OSL: DOF) said Monday afternoon it placed an unsecured bond of NOK950m and bought back bonds with a face value of NOK662.5m under its DOF06 issue, at a price of 104.33%.
Selling of safe-haven bonds took the upper hand, but some investors bought back bonds whose prices have fallen, limiting the yield's rise.
But as Tokyo stocks trimmed earlier gains into the afternoon, investors bought back bonds, limiting the yield's rise, they added.
BNP Paribas had already completed three tenders for the bonds, buying back bonds with a face value of EUR1.233bn.
The yield on the benchmark 10-year Japanese government bond inched lower Wednesday morning as investors bought back bonds after initial selling on Tokyo stocks gains and higher U.S.
The bank has already completed three tenders for the bonds, buying back bonds with a face value of EUR1.233bn and a nominal value of around EUR9.4bn in total, the report noted.
Tokyo equities later fell on a stronger yen, prompting some players to buy back bonds.