Back away

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Back away

In the context of general equities, to withdraw from a previously declared interest, indication, or transaction; broker-dealer's failure, as a market maker in a given security, to make good on a bid/offer for the minimum quantity.

Back Away

To withdraw from a previously stated intent to conduct a certain transaction. For example, if a broker-dealer expresses an interest in buying shares of Stock X and then changes his/her mind, the broker-dealer is said to back away from the transaction.
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When they become unbalanced, a gentle hand on the back as a reminder is all that is needed to once again bring them into alignment.
5, the running back and the offensive line run Zone Right.
Getting back into the groove of teaching and high school life was an adjustment.
From Mountain Pose, extend your arms upward without changing anything else and you'll be in Upward Arms Pose (Urdbva Hastasana) which lengthens your sides, back, and abdomen.
Ikegawa and his colleagues identified a genetic component in lumbar-disk disease by comparing the DNA of 188 people who have the disease and 367 people with healthy backs.
We are very pleased to be joining the CBM family," said Cam Koblish, president & CEO - BACK Aviation Solutions.
Gently pull up on the front triangle by trying to stop an imaginary flow of urine, and find the back triangle by gently pulling up on the muscles that stop you from breaking wind.
Researchers at Harvard Medical School report the average reduction in back pain with this type of non-pain-contingent strengthening treatment is 35%.
But treating the back wages as taxable in 1994 would subject both the Indians and the players to significant tax liability.
Accordingly, the tax should not be added back to Federal taxable income in computing the Virginia corporate income tax.
In order for economic incentives to work, say analysts such as Gates and van Santen, countries must initiate "property rights-based" management systems that allow them to buy back the lives of the fish they are trying to save.
An estimated 30% of the US population has chronic low back pain and, and LPNs are highly represented among them.