Baby Boomers

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Baby Boomers

A generation of children born in the years following World War II. While there is debate about the years in which baby boomers were born, the U.S. Census Bureau defines the generation as being born between 1946 and 1964. The baby boomer generation was one of the largest in U.S. history and had a significant cultural and economic impact. Their impact on American social programs like Social Security and Medicare is expected to increase significantly as they retire in larger numbers.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Infrastructure investments geared toward fostering this type of export-based employment growth likely will have minimal influence on the rising number of footloose baby boomer migrants who are looking for an improved quality of life.
When asked about what the most important service their bank provided was, Millennials reflected much different attitudes than older Americans: Millennials were twice as likely as Baby Boomers to list a mobile app as most important (27 percent v 14 perent), while Baby Boomers were twice as likely to list in person presence (20 versus 11 percent).
Overall, millennials appear to be most in tune with the dangers of cyberattacks, with 26 percent claiming to be very concerned about a potential cyberattack affecting their business, compared to 8 percent of Generation Xers and 7 percent of baby boomers. Twenty-six percent of millennials think cyberattacks happen more frequently in small businesses.
Many companies mistakenly assume that Baby Boomers have already fixated on the brands from which they will buy and that their earning and spending potential is on the decline, and so they've lost interest in marketing to them.
First up is the BlackRock 2014 Global Investor Pulse Survey, which finds that Millennials seem to be more engaged, confident and optimistic about their financial situation and future prospects than Gen Xers or Baby Boomers.
RealtyTrac, a provider of housing data, recently released its "Q2 2014 Residential Property Rental Report," which, among other data points, ranked the best markets for renting to Baby Boomers and Millennials.
Interestingly enough, even for the most private of information, at least 30% of Millennials who claimed they would not provide it said they would do so after receiving an incentive (for example, a $10 coupon toward their next purchase), whereas only 13% of baby boomers could be swayed by the same types of incentives.
Synopsis: Baby Boomers and Gen X employees are distinctly less engaged than others -- and they make up 88% of the U.S.
"From energy bars to vegetable drinks to supplement beverages to protein bars to frozen foods, there is really a broad product application and a lot of potential within the baby boomer market," Meeder says.