risk aversion

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Risk Aversion

The subjective tendency of investors to avoid unnecessary risk. It is subjective because different investors have different definitions of unnecessary. An investor seeking a large return is likely to see more risk as necessary, while one who only wants a small return would find such an investment strategy reckless. However, most rational economic actors are sufficiently risk averse such that, given two investments with the same return and different levels of risk, they would choose the less risky investment.

risk aversion

The tendency of investors to avoid risky investments. Thus, if two investments offer the same expected yield but have different risk characteristics, investors will choose the one with the lowest variability in returns. If investors are risk averse, higher-risk investments must offer higher expected yields. Otherwise, they will not be competitive with the less risky investments.

risk aversion

the tendency for managers, consumers and other decision-makers to avoid undertaking risks and to choose less risky alternatives. See RISK PREMIUM.

risk aversion

the tendency for managers, consumers and other decision makers to avoid undertaking risks and to choose less risky alternatives. See RISK PREMIUM.
References in periodicals archive ?
The proposition states that competitive workers exert more effort for a given piece rate than self-oriented ones do and that inequality-averse workers who are also behindness averse exert more effort than self-oriented ones do when they would expect to be behind at the self-oriented level of effort.
For example, in some situations individuals are risk seeking if a choice such as two alternative medical procedures are presented as having different mortality rates (a loss frame) but are risk averse if the same two procedures and equivalent odds are given for survival rates (a gain frame) (McNeil et al.
From Kihlstrom-Mirman's definition, this implies the individual is both wealth and risk averse while, according to Richard's definition, the individual could be a health or wealth risk-lover, which is a strong restriction.
The theory of tax aversion is that voters are not averse to all taxes equally, but are averse to some types of taxation more than others.
Japanese insurers tend to be more averse to risk than their counterparts in other parts of the world.
In fact, this may be the switch about which Jolley speaks to "turn on" some of the technology averse in the profession.
In addition, the other of their purposes is to conduct the comparative static analysis for the risk averse LMF.
com/research/ws7bf5/asian_investors_h) has announced the addition of the "Asian Investors: Healthy Risk Appetite Remains, But Averse Investors on the Rise" report to their offering.
Global Banking News-August 20, 2014--HSBC survey says Canadian companies averse to Chinese currency
I examine how the risk preference variables affect the hazard rate into marriage and find that the more risk averse marry sooner, l also exploit sibling data from the NLSY79 to examine the robustness of the empirical results by controlling for unobserved family effects that might be correlated with risk attitudes and find qualitatively similar results.
Judge Matthews accepted there had been a "considerable amount of averse publicity" but said he was "not satisfied it will lead to real and unavoidable risk of an unavoidably unfair trial".
Not surprisingly, search consultants unanimously agree that board members are risk averse.