Automotive Industry

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Automotive Industry

A division of manufacturing that produces, builds, and sells motor vehicles. As driving became more common in the early and mid-20th century, the automotive industry expanded significantly. In the early 21st century, it continued to expand in South America, China, India, and other newly developed countries, though it has stagnated in older markets like the United States and Japan. Most automobiles operate on an internal combustion engine, the use of which has become increasingly controversial because of concerns about emissions.
References in periodicals archive ?
M2 EQUITYBITES-February 1, 2019--Volkswagen Group retains leadership spot amongst global automakers in 2018
Korean automakers have sold 6,307 cars at a value of EGP 955m.
"CES is a place where automakers can reach an entire new audience of consumers who are looking for what's next," said Costantine Samaras, a professor of engineering at Carnegie Mellon University.
by Asian automakers are actually built at plants within North America, and not in Asia.
The scientists' group has ranked the eight top-selling automakers based on carbon and smog-forming emissions of their fleets, who they say have reduced pollution for the first time, Fox News reported.
According to the officials of the Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association, which hosts the show, it had not received applications from the three automakers by the deadline at the end of February.
According to Reuters, the stringent new Euro V rules would require automakers to reduce particulate matter and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission levels in diesel-powered cars by 80 percent and 20 percent, respectively.
In March, the automaker received 274 billion yen from three Mitsubishi group firms -- Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Mitsubishi Corp.
The first 40 years of the automaker's life (most of his early career was spent as a troubleshooting engineer with a Detroit electrical utility) take up less than a fifth of the book.
In many crashworthiness cases, automakers argue that a safer, stronger vehicle could not have prevented the plaintiff's injuries because the crash was a "heck of a wreck": It was so violent and involved such high speeds that there was no feasible way to better protect the vehicle's occupants.
At this initial stage, the representative non-domestic automaker with concentration on passenger cars (Automaker C) chooses to be perceived indifferent to CAFE debates, even though it has a competitive advantage in fuel efficiency and would have certain advantages if the higher CAFE standards were legislated.
Nothing has pleased the world's largest automaker more than the increasing of its market share in the home market for two consecutive years, most recently a gain of 0.3 per cent in 2002 to 28.4 per cent.