Authoritarian

(redirected from authoritarians)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

Authoritarian

A person who believes in or is involved with a political or economic system characterized by submission to authority, whether it is a person, party, or class. In an authoritarian society, the individuals exist to serve the state or ruling power. The authority may rule arbitrarily; that is, it is not bound by its own laws. This concept is opposed to democracy, individualism, and the rule of law. Democratic societies are thought to offer greater impetus for long-term economic growth, although authoritarian counterexamples exist.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Setting aside the issue of whet her the questions measure learned cultural dispositions or innate temperament, they do enable researchers to assess the authoritarian values held by respondents.
However, some of the most notorious proposals have clustered around a common theme: advocacy of authoritarian central government as the most promising approach for addressing the ecological crisis.
And even if one were to accept the validity of the authoritarian syndrome, the original researchers were never able to make a convincing case that it was caused by authoritarian childrearing practices.
It may be premature, however, to conclude that authoritarians fear interactions with other people, or have a general predisposition toward fear.
Where the authoritarian demands blind obedience to a doctrine, god, or authority figure, the liberal endorses an approach taken directly from Kant's notion of enlightenment with its emphasis on critical thinking and reflection.
The benevolent authoritarian cares for people but is caught between caring and being threatened by opposition, especially as differences develop.
One of the most influential but controversial of these classics was The Authoritarian Personality.
We use a fully interactive analysis of covariance model to test whether democratic and authoritarian regimes respond differently to each constraint.
Two necessary qualifications: 'a right-wing authoritarian follower doesn't necessarily have conservative political views.
The analytical trap is to assume that authoritarian governments, which suppress political pluralism and free expression in order to maintain power at home, would be inclined to act differently internationally.
Being 'religious' does not automatically build a firewall against accepting totalitarianism, and when fundamentalist religions teach authoritarian submission, authoritarian aggression, and conventionalism, they help create the problem.
Despite the fact that this growing coordination negatively impacts the interests of democratic nations, states in the West, including the United States, have responded weakly to the policies of the authoritarian states.