Authoritarian

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Authoritarian

A person who believes in or is involved with a political or economic system characterized by submission to authority, whether it is a person, party, or class. In an authoritarian society, the individuals exist to serve the state or ruling power. The authority may rule arbitrarily; that is, it is not bound by its own laws. This concept is opposed to democracy, individualism, and the rule of law. Democratic societies are thought to offer greater impetus for long-term economic growth, although authoritarian counterexamples exist.
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According to the author, the turning point for Russia's political life from competitive democracy toward authoritarianism was the 2004 election.
This finding is consistent with those reported in previous research on authoritarianism and attitudes toward various forms of violence (e.
While most of the West remains focused upon conflicts that have exploded in its undertow, including civil wars in Libya and Syria, we should not lose sight of another development in the Middle East - that of retrenched authoritarianism.
This trend has even been reflected in the writings of the early eco-authoritarians themselves, with more recent publications by Robert Heilbroner and William Ophuls explicitly rejecting authoritarianism in favour of other alternatives.
The 2011-2012 Electoral Cycle"; "The Past and Future of Russian Authoritarianism.
Large numbers of researches have been conducted on importance of parenting style, effect of authoritarian parenting style among children, father's authoritarianism and reasons of test anxiety among adolescents, and its negative impacts.
Combining formal game-theoretic models, analysis of original cross-national datasets and an impressive array of short illustrative case-studies, he gives new insights into many of the key questions which occupy scholars of comparative authoritarianism.
But the research on authoritarianism, originally a research program supported by American Jewish organizations that was intended to unveil the psychological background of antisemitism in the 1940s in the United States, was finally concluded in a vast amount of researches on the general attitudes to power and social norms and on dominance and submission in general, eventually losing its original interest in antisemitism.
He argued that the time of financial crisis and inequality looming big among EU member states is a prime time for the rearing of authoritarianism in countries which are worse off.
Krastev challenged the assumptions that underpin popular theories of authoritarianism and discussed how the very elements that undermined these regimes in 1989, precipitating the collapse of the Soviet Union, contribute to their durability today.
Instead, a new variety of authoritarianism has arisen in many countries, one that exists in the space between old-style iron-fist authoritarian rule and Western democracy.
Malice and sarcasm towards long-suffering Kyrgyz people (who despite poverty find strength to stand up against despotism and economic crime) are inappropriate because constitutional establishment of authoritarianism in Kyrgyzstan is developing in a slower pace than in Kazakhstan, the expert said.