Attrition

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Attrition

The slow, gradual reduction of members in a company or organization due to retirement, resignation or death. That is, members lost through attrition are not replaced in the same numbers. Attrition may be deliberate; that is, if a company is downsizing, it may prefer to lose employees through attrition rather than to conduct layoffs. Other times, however, attrition may be a sign of a weak company or organization unable to attract talent. Attrition is also called natural wastage.
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That's also part of the reason those attritional loss ratios should continue to improve as the rates start to "earn through the portfolio and as underwriters maintain their discipline," he added.
The authors suggest that overutilization of corticosteroid injections can weaken the A1 pulley system and lead to eventual attritional rupture.
BEIRUT: In a performance reminiscent of Inter Milan in 2010, a 10-man Chelsea pulled off a remarkable feat of attritional football to win 3-2 on aggregate (2-2 on the night) against Barcelona in the Nou Camp Tuesday to earn a place in the Champions League final.
"It's going to be attritional cricket for five days," he added.
Cardiff worked tirelessly to carve out only a handful of chances over the course of 90 attritional minutes at the Cardiff City Stadium.
Events with expected losses below this threshold are included as part of the company's attritional losses.
But limited-overs star Morgan showed he has the temperament to succeed in the longer format as he followed Collingwood's lead in a period of attritional, defensive cricket before freeing his arms to bring up his century with a big straight six.
Additionally, the US tactical focus on killing or capturing enemies promised little more than attritional warfare without operational breakthrough.
At the Rose Bowl, Hampshire made champions Sussex work hard for their wickets on an attritional second day, writes David Clough.
Aon stated that insurers incurred $1.72 billion in claims for hull, liability and estimated "attritional losses" in 2007 while taking in just $1.51 billion in premiums, down 11% compared to 2006 and the lowest figure since 2000.
The error statistics from each set of data are contrasted to demonstrate contact linguistic mechanisms and specific grammatical and lexical features that are most prone to attritional forces.
A lot of the bottom-end reinsurance capacity disappeared, so many accounts with attritional losses or claims activity were not renewed.