Attribution

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Attribution

The assignment of cause. For example, if one attributes a statement to a CEO, one says the CEO made the statement. Likewise, if one attributes a market bounce to GDP growth, one says the GDP growth caused the bounce.
References in periodicals archive ?
Attributions consist of three different parts: internality, stability, and globality.
The Attributional Style Questionnaire (ASQ; Peterson, Semmel, von Baeyer, Abramson, Metalsky, & Seligrnan, 1982) was used to assess attributions for positive and negative events.
Recent research in the field of self-regulated learning has also emphasized the importance of the role of attributions as motivational variables of self-regulated learning.
Weiner (1974), in his development of the achievement motivation model of attributions, classified causal attributions across two dimensions; the locus of causality, and the stability of the cause.
Attributions are drawn from it and students respond to a series of attributions related to that particular scenario.
Another important dimension of attributions involves controllability (Weiner, 1986).
Standard Life was looking for a partner that could not only deliver quality attribution modelling, but also help it embrace predictive analytics for its planning decisions.
Self-threat and product failure: How internal attributions of blame affect consumer complaining behavior.
This has arguably led to a certain amount of judicial reluctance to impose liability on auction houses in relation to attributions.
Research has shown that responsibility attributions are often driven by partisan motives (e.
Although little is known about the processes by which participant and team attributions emerge, it seems that personality, experience, and intergroup relationships act as precursors to athlete attributions (Allen et al.
Attributions are among the cognitive constructs making up the individual's own model of symptoms and illness (Senesky, 1997).