Attribution

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Attribution

The assignment of cause. For example, if one attributes a statement to a CEO, one says the CEO made the statement. Likewise, if one attributes a market bounce to GDP growth, one says the GDP growth caused the bounce.
References in periodicals archive ?
The political statements published recently on Twitter attributed to Khaffaf related to the political process in Iraq./ End
"The comments that 'Mian sahib won't be able to show his face' and that 'there are 10 flaws in the PTI and a hundred in the PML-N' were attributed to me," he noted a few statements being attributed to him.
Some papers have been published for this survey.[sup][2],[3],[4],[5] The present study was a secondary analysis of data from the Second China National Sample Survey on Disability and aimed to describe the disability prevalence rates attributed to mental disorders, their distribution by sociodemographic factors, and utilizations of service.
Although these predicates, considered gnoseologically, are first found in the creature, they can only prevail as divine perfections, because they are attributed to God in their highest degree, and thus free from any form of only contingent realization.
Lot 10: Heating / Ventilation / Plumbing (attributed)
BEIRUT: The Army Command-General Directorate released a statement Monday rejecting quotes attributed to Military Intelligence Director Edmond Fadel.
The results indicate the performance (satisfaction) attributed to skills and attributes by tourism managers ranged from 3.41 to 4.15, with 3.88 as the mean value.
Again, the originated and created is not a "thing" from beforehand for the act of origination or creation to be attributed to it--in hindsight as it were.
The devastating 2004 hurricane season can only partially be attributed to climate change, experts say.
In year 2, the P group sustained a $200 CNOL, attributed as follows: $90 to P, $70 to S1 and $40 to S2.
coffee companies, I find fault with much of the premise of Joshua Kurlantzick's article on the current crisis affecting the global coffee industry, "Coffee Snobs Unite," but I am particularly concerned about his use of quotes attributed to me.
Cleo's decline can, I believe, be attributed to more than her "mistakenly look[ing] to high living" (Rodgers 170).