Weight

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Related to atomic weight: molecular weight

Weight

Weighted

Describing an average in which some values count for more than others. For example, if an index consisting of 10 stocks is weighted for price, this means that the average price of the stocks will move more when the stocks with higher price move. Most indices use weighted averages so "smaller" values do not affect the index inordinately. This helps correct for the fact that averages tend to be affected by extreme values. One of the most common ways of weighting an average is to weight for market capitalization.
References in periodicals archive ?
The new curriculum does not specify and say tables should be provided to test atomic weight.
In 1911 Marie Curie was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for producing a pure metal sample of radium and establishing the atomic weight of radium and polonium.
They discovered hydrogen was the lightest of the elements and gave it an atomic weight of one.
One chemistry question originally read, "Which one of the following could not be the atomic weight of three given isotopes of the elements?
As an ancillary benefit, the spike systems also will enable the USGS to re-measure the isotopic composition of atmospheric argon and calculate a new atomic weight for argon.
Thus, the atomic weight of oxygen, with eight protons and eight neutrons, is about sixteen.
The company uses a number of methods for the manufacture of alloys, the composition of which can be specified in atomic weight or weight percent, depending on specific customer requirements.
He made a table whose eight vertical columns contained elements of the same valence and whose horizontal rows arrayed the elements in order of ascending atomic weight.
Reuters reports that a team of German scientists discovered a new element with "an atomic weight of 272 - meaning it is 272 times heavier than hydrogen.
Argon was chosen as the filler due- to its noncorrosive properties and its atomic weight, between 2 and 2.
When he proposed his atomic theory in 1803, John Dalton improved on the Greeks' idea that all matter was composed of tiny, indivisible particles by introducing the concept of atomic weight.