Weight

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Related to atomic weight: molecular weight

Weight

Weighted

Describing an average in which some values count for more than others. For example, if an index consisting of 10 stocks is weighted for price, this means that the average price of the stocks will move more when the stocks with higher price move. Most indices use weighted averages so "smaller" values do not affect the index inordinately. This helps correct for the fact that averages tend to be affected by extreme values. One of the most common ways of weighting an average is to weight for market capitalization.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the question was changed to "Which one of the following could be the atomic weight ...?" now 62 percent got it right.
Elements placed according to the value of their atomic weights present a clear periodicity of properties.
New Columbia Encyclopedia, at atomic weights and hydrogen.
Elizabeth Church's "The Atomic Weight of Love" will be discussed from 9:30 to 11 a.m.
According to atomic weight stoichiometry corresponding amount of Ti, O, Mn were observed to be 31.62%, 62.12%, and 4.97%, respectively.
The [Cd.sub.2]Sn[O.sub.4] powder was prepared from the solid state reaction of the well-blended mixture of required quantities of CdO (99.99% pure-Merck) and Sn[O.sub.2] (99.99% pure-Merck) in the atomic weight ratio of 2: 1.
Intended for a second course in combinatorial games, this graduate textbook introduces tools for analyzing specific game values, such as mean, temperature, reduced canonical form, and atomic weight, and applies the basic theory of short partizan games to the abstract algebraic and combinatorial structure of short game values.
The absolute value of the difference between the atomic weight given by NIST and the atomic weight calculated from the associated continued fraction representation is defined as numerical error and listed in the tables.
By the time researchers recognized in 1913 that elements should be arranged by atomic number (the number of protons in their nuclei) rather than by atomic weight, only seven gaps remained in the list of naturally occurring elements.
However, radioactive decay is entirely different: there is no distribution of atomic weight of the decaying nucleus.
Prout's name is associated with the two hypotheses of integral atomic weights and the unity of matter, i.e., the atomic weights of all chemical elements are whole-number multiples of the atomic weight of hydrogen.