Z

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Related to atomic number: Isotopes, atomic weight

Z

Fifth letter of a Nasdaq stock symbol indicating that listing is a fifth class of preferred stock, a stub, a certificate representing a limited partnership interest, foreign preferred when issued, or a second class of warrants.

Z

1. A symbol appearing next to a stock listed on NASDAQ indicating that the share being traded has a miscellaneous right, warrant, or receipt attached to it. All NASDAQ listings use a four-letter abbreviation; if a Z follows the abbreviation, it indicates that the share's category does not easily fit into other categories.

2. In over-the-counter trading, a symbol meaning that no quote is available for a security.

3. On a table, a symbol indicating an exact number, instead of an estimate, of securities traded.

z

1. Used in stock transaction tables in newspapers to indicate that the volume reported is the actual number of shares transacted, not the number of round lots: z150.
2. Used in over-the-counter stock transaction tables to indicate that no representative quote is available: z.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, to compare the relative merit of various average atomic number models, we found the precision of the measurement to be more critical.
For example, the element with atomic number 123 would be UNBITRIUM; the element with atomic number 444 would be QUADQUADQUADIUM; the element with atomic number 690 would be HEXENNILIUM; and the element with atomic number 999 would be ENNENNENNIUM.
Have them create a nametag with their atomic mass and atomic number, and be addressed in class as their element name.
The elements are arranged by their atomic number, starling with the galactic center and circle outwards.
Each small square displays the standard abbreviation and atomic number for its element.
The net result is that the nucleus ends up with one proton more than it started with, which makes it an element that is one higher in atomic number.
First off, let's take a look at the periodic table, the listing of chemical elements in atomic number order and the corresponding symbols.
Linus Pauling (see 1931) had pointed out that the inert gas atoms grew less inert as their atomic number increased, so that those with higher atomic numbers might be induced to form a bond with fluorine, which was the most active of all elements and the most apt to snatch an electron from unlikely places.
The atom signaled its presence by disintegrating into lighter and lighter elements, from atomic number 112 to 110 to 108 and so on.
Since the neptunium isotope that had been located emitted beta particles, it had to gain another unit in atomic number and produce element number 94, which was named plutonium, for the planet Pluto.