population

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population

  1. the total number of people resident in a country at a particular point in time. The UK, for example, had a population of 59 million people in 2004. The size of the population is determined by past and present birth and death rates, together with net migration trends – the number of people leaving the country to live abroad (emigration) compared with the number entering the country to take up residence (immigration). The UK birth rate is currently 11 births per 1000 of the population per annum and the death rate 10 per 1000 of the population per annum. In most advanced countries, both birth and death rates have declined over the long run because of rising living standards and improved medical care; this has produced slow-growing, ageing populations.

    The total size of the population and its composition in terms of proportion of males to females and age-group distributions, combined with various SOCIOECONOMIC factors influencing buying characteristics, are important to businesses in assessing the market potential for their products.

  2. all possible observations of a certain phenomenon in statistical analysis, for example incomes of all people resident in a country. Where it is too time-consuming and expensive to record all possible observations it is necessary to take a SAMPLE, for example the incomes of 1000 citizens, and generalize about the incomes of all citizens from this sample. See STATISTICAL INFERENCE.
Populationclick for a larger image
Fig. 144 Population. The UK birth and death rates, measured in numbers per 1,000 of the population, from 1740 to 2004.

population

the total number of people resident in a country. The size of the population is determined by past and present BIRTH RATES and DEATH RATES as well as MIGRATION trends. In most advanced industrial countries, both birth and death rates have declined over the long run (see DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION), which has produced slow-growing populations. The size and growth of a country's population determine the size of the LABOUR FORCE that is available to produce output, a country's GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT divided by its population providing a measure of the country's general prosperity (see INCOME PER HEAD). In 2004 the UK's population was 59 million (see Fig. 144 ). By comparison, the population of Germany was 82 million, the USA 288 million, Japan 127 million, India 1,048 million and China 1,281 million.
References in periodicals archive ?
The orientation video, later converted to a DVD format, included interviews with the agency director and staff that emphasized the strength-based approach used with an at-risk population.
Homophobic beliefs and attitudes often cause serious maladjustment in GLBT youth, making them the most at-risk population in our schools today (Taylor, 2000).
They are in a unique position to detect students' changing attitudes around food, weight, and body shape; act as role models for students; positively influence a wide range of the at-risk population for developing eating disorders; and convey important messages about healthy behaviors and stress management (Powers & Johnson, 1999; Russell & Ryder, 2001a, 2001b; Smolak, Harris, Levine, & Shisslak, 2001).
But demographics say there will be a great increase in the at-risk population over the next few years, so I expect it will meet 10,100 again soon.
The at-risk population is expected to grow in the future (Mittelstaedt & Wallach, 1989).
We need to determine the optimal dose of 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine that can be safely administered to this at-risk population and whether one or two doses arc needed.
Topics include the impact of illicit drug policies on the HIV epidemic, HIV/AIDS in prison; developments in HIV therapy, the role of civil society in treatment and control, how European health systems have reacted to AIDS, the impact of population movement, the economics and politics of antiretroviral drugs in transition countries, and female migrant workers as an at-risk population.
By understanding how young Latino parents perceive the influence of cultural/ethnic identity, then health care providers, schools, and community agencies can develop programs and processes to better serve this at-risk population.
VL is the most severe clinical form within the leishmaniasis complex, which is endemic in 88 countries with an at-risk population of approximately 350 million (1).
And if numbers of people with impaired glucose tolerance, or prediabetes, are added to that sum, the at-risk population swells to 800 million by 2025, he said.
Moreover, teachers' positive feedback regarding progress on the socialization skills necessary for success in the classroom makes the program critically supportive for this at-risk population.