delivery

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Delivery

The tender and receipt of an actual commodity or financial instrument in settlement of a futures contract.

Delivery

The transfer of a security or an underlying asset to a buyer. The term is often used in options, forward, and futures contracts, in which payment and delivery are separated by a relatively long period of time. Most of the time, however, delivery does not occur, as most traders offset their positions with opposite contracts.

delivery

1. The transfer of a security to an investor's broker in order to satisfy an executed sell order. Delivery is required by the settlement date.
2. The transfer of a specified commodity in order to meet the requirements of a commodity contract that has been sold.

delivery

The transfer of possession from one person to another.Deeds and leases require delivery before they are effective. Delivery does not depend on manual transfer, but does depend on the intent of the parties. Deeds are delivered when placed within the possession or control of the grantee in such a manner that the grantor cannot regain possession or control.

References in periodicals archive ?
Currently the scope of practice of a professional nurse with midwifery (the vast majority of nursing staff running maternity units) does not allow them to perform assisted delivery and manual vacuum aspiration.
The normal staff complement consists of professional nurses with midwifery, whose scope of practice does not include performing assisted delivery. There is an absolute shortage of advanced midwives to work in CHCs and district hospitals.
An overall assisted delivery rate of <1% is too low and is probably due to loss of skill in performing AVD and/or lack of willingness to perform it, as well as lack of the necessary equipment.
Obstetric outcome Outcome N (%) Mode of delivery Normal vaginal delivery 82 (43.4) Assisted delivery 31 (16.4) Elective caesarean section 47 (24.9) Emergency caesarean section 28 (14.8) Undelivered 1 (0.5) Gestational age at delivery (weeks) Mean (SD) 35.8 [+ or -] 5.3 Minimum 9 Maximum 42 Table IV.
Mothers who gave birth during regular hours were 43% more likely to have an instrumentally assisted delivery, 10% more likely to have an episiotomy, 86% more likely to have drug-augmented labor, and 30% more likely to experience severe tearing, the report indicates.
Recent figures for births without any form of intervention - including induction, Caesarean section, assisted delivery or any form of anaesthetic - show just 44 per cent achieve a natural delivery.
The determination about whether to provide assisted delivery by forceps or vacuum is usually left to physicians, but women could become more active participants in the decision-making process if they were informed beforehand about the varying risks of later incontinence before these procedures were performed.
The assisted delivery rate, including delivery by traditional midwives, has increased by 3 percent since 2008, from 61 percent to 64 percent.
Major risk factors identified were; home and assisted delivery 5 (75%), consanguinity 10 (50%), infections 8 (40%) and lack of antenatal care 6 (30%).
They are also more likely to end in an assisted delivery with forceps, ventouse or a Caesarean.