Assimilation

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Assimilation

The public absorption of a new issue of stocks once the stock has been completely sold by underwriter. See: Absorbed.

Assimilation

The sale of the totality of a new issue. That is, assimilation occurs when investors buy the issue from underwriters and begin trading it like any other security.
References in periodicals archive ?
To the best of our knowledge, no cloudy radiance observations, either from geostationary or polar-orbiting satellites, are effectively assimilated into current-generation U.S.
These changes allow TAMDAR data to be applied directly at the pressure they are observed at, remove the assumption that the atmosphere is following a standard lapse rate, remove the assumption that wind is constant with height, and permit the TAMDAR moisture fields to be assimilated. Note that the Obsgrid modifications were included in the standard releases of Obsgrid starting in V3.8, while the code to allow pre-Obsgrid interpolation to additional vertical levels is included in Ungrib starting in V3.9.
It shows strong growth in Latin America; thus converting to evangelical Protestantism means accepting religious leaders who are far less "assimilated" than American Catholics.
Gerald Early comments that Du Bois "saw blacks as being caught, Hamlet-like, between the issue of" living as "an assimilated American" or "an unassimilated Negro" (xx).
Although many of our people have assimilated and are now Christians, within every tribe there is a core group of people who prefer the old ways and customs and seek to preserve and practice them.
Modern artists long ago discovered and assimilated the geometry, line and shapes of African sculpture.
And while expellees' children generally assimilated to West and East German societies, grandchildren often developed a certain nostalgia for their grandparents' homelands.
At the same time, Icelandic has assimilated foreign words throughout its history, and it is likely that foreign vocabulary (predominantly English) will continue to be assimilated, and many neologisms will be invented.
When Jesus' word and way are assimilated, he becomes 'habit forming"' (p.
"The commission observed that the deaconesses mentioned in the tradition of the early church cannot simply be assimilated to ordained deacons," he says.