Aspirin

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Aspirin

Australian Stock Price Riskless Indexed Notes. Zero-coupon four-year bonds repayable at face value plus the percentage increase by which the Australian stock index of all ordinaries (common stocks) rises above a predefined level during the given period.

Aspirin

Australian Stock Price Riskless Index Note. A debt security with no coupon with a return based on the return of a benchmark stock index. Unlike most zero-coupon bonds, an Aspirin is issued at face value; however, like others, it is redeemed at face value at maturity, which is four years after issue. The return (or the equivalent of a coupon) on an Aspirin is the fact that the bondholder receives a percentage of the return on the Australian all-ordinaries stock index provided it is over a certain amount. For example, if the limit is 5% and the return is 9% over the four years of the Aspirin, the bondholder receives a return of 4%. However, if the return on the all-ordinaries index falls below the limit, the bondholder receives no return. Aspirins allow investors to participate in the stock market without assuming all of the risk involved.
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However, when cardiovascular risk is low, the downside of aspirin therapy may overwhelm any possible benefits.
If you are already taking a daily aspirin, don't stop without contacting your doctor, as the abrupt withdrawal of aspirin can sometimes lead to a heightened risk for a blood clot.
You can lower your cardiovascular risk without taking aspirin through the following heart-healthy strategies:
A study by the Physicians Health Group concluded that an aspirin a day was an effective preventative treatment against heart attacks.
Follow-up studies revealed that aspirin alone did nothing to prevent heart attacks.
12, 2002, British Medical Journal (BMJ), he explained that aspirin merely masks heart attacks, producing a "cosmetic" blip in epidemiological statistics.
A further analysis focused on the patients who took aspirin for at least two years.
Sir John said: "Before anyone begins to take aspirin on a regular basis they should consult their doctor as aspirin is known to bring with it a risk of stomach complaints including ulcers.
COX-1 plays a role in how platelets form in the bloodstream and aspirin can help make platelets less sticky and reduce the risk of clot formation.
Naeim notes that in the Lancet study, the protective results were realized after five years of daily aspirin therapy.