Art

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Art

Any visual, creative material. Examples of art include drawings, videos and computer graphics. Art may be bought and sold as an asset (indeed, famous art such as the Mona Lisa is worth many millions of dollars), but it is also used in marketing to help a product appeal to buyers.
References in classic literature ?
Then the pay is not derived by the several artists from their respective arts. But the truth is, that while the art of medicine gives health, and the art of the builder builds a house, another art attends them which is the art of pay.
Thus the new in art is always formed out of the old.
His contention is that racing, without time allowances for anything else but tonnage - that is, for size - has fostered the fine art of sailing to the pitch of perfection.
There is another art which imitates by means of language alone, and that either in prose or verse--which, verse, again, may either combine different metres or consist of but one kind--but this has hitherto been without a name.
It is, of course, a ridiculous word to apply to a work of art. For what is morbidity but a mood of emotion or a mode of thought that one cannot express?
It is astonishing how much the Art -- or I may almost call it instinct -- of Sight Recognition is developed by the habitual practice of it and by the avoidance of the custom of "Feeling".
And they were happy; for they had their Art, and they had each other.
Impossible to class it in that ancient family of sombre, mysterious churches, low and crushed as it were by the round arch, almost Egyptian, with the exception of the ceiling; all hieroglyphics, all sacerdotal, all symbolical, more loaded in their ornaments, with lozenges and zigzags, than with flowers, with flowers than with animals, with animals than with men; the work of the architect less than of the bishop; first transformation of art, all impressed with theocratic and military discipline, taking root in the Lower Empire, and stopping with the time of William the Conqueror.
With his disinterested passion for art, he had a real desire to call the attention of the wise to a talent which was in the highest degree original; but he was too good a journalist to be unaware that the "human interest" would enable him more easily to effect his purpose.
It falls naturally into two parts, the first of about twenty years, when he was concerned almost altogether with Art, chiefly Painting and Architecture; and the second somewhat longer, when he was intensely absorbed in the problems of society and strenuously working as a social reformer.
To refrain from intercepting an enemy whose banners are in perfect order, to refrain from attacking an army drawn up in calm and confident array:--this is the art of studying circumstances.
"But whatever art thou about!" called out Zarathustra in alarm, for he saw a deal of blood streaming over the naked arm,--"what hath hurt thee?