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Line

1. In technical analysis, a situation in which the supply and demand for a security are largely the same. A line means that the security is unlikely to see any rapid fluctuation in price. It is called a line because, when plotted on a graph, it looks like a roughly horizontal line. Technical analysts look for signals that a line is ready to break one way or another before recommending that investors take a position on a security.

2. Informal; workers in a large, industrial company. They are called the line because, historically, they assembled the parts of a product while literally standing next to each other in a long line, also called an assembly line.

line

In technical analysis, a horizontal pattern on a price chart indicating a period during which supply and demand for a security are relatively equal. Technical analysts generally look for the price to break away from the line, at which time they are likely to take a position in the direction of the movement. See also making a line.
References in periodicals archive ?
Key Words: Radial artery cannulation, Arterial line, Ultrasound guided arterial line placement
Arterial waveform analysis with FloTrac and LiDCO provides the option to use only a peripheral arterial line for cardiac output measurement.
Although considered a minimally invasive technique, the placement of a peripheral arterial line is time-consuming and associated on rare occasion with potentially harmful complications, including infection, thrombosis, and hematoma [5].
The 16 gauge fluid line and second IV line were discontinued, leaving the cannula and extension in situ, whilst the arterial line remained for the PACU phase of care.
The use of topical nitroglycerin ointment to treat peripheral tissue ischemia secondary to arterial line complications in neonates.
The Dialysis Flow Sheet was also revised twice to check and document findings of arterial lines pressures every 30 minutes.
(3) In contrast, some physical therapy literature has promoted the mobilization of patients with femoral arterial lines. (4) Although some conservative physicians prefer not to have their patients sit with femoral arterial lines, Ciesla et al.
It is preferable to insert a radial arterial line if arterial blood gas and lactate analysis is required.
Inclusion criteria were: older than 15 years, mechanically ventilated with an arterial line in the radial artery for blood gas sampling, invasive blood pressure monitoring and a central venous catheter in situ.
* Any medicine inadvertently administered into the arterial line may form crystals and cause catastrophic ischaemia of the limb.
When setting up the extracorporeal circuit we would cut the arterial line (yes, cut it--) and insert an injection port.