Arithmetic Mean Average

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Related to arithmetic means: Finite sequence, geometric means

Arithmetic Mean Average

An average calculated by adding the value of the points in a data set and dividing the sum by the number of data points. For example, suppose one wishes to calculate the average income of a country with exactly five people in it, and their incomes are $25,000, $26,000, $43,000, $70,000, and $72,000. It is calculated as:

($25,000 + $26,000 + $43,000 + $70,000 + $72,000) / 5 = $47,200.

A limitation to the arithmetic mean average is that it can be overly affected by extremes in either direction. For example, if one of the five persons in the country earns $100 billion per year, the arithmetic mean average income would be in the billions and would not accurately count the other four citizens. For this reason, many analysts use the median in conjunction with the arithmetic mean average. The arithmetic mean average is also called simply the mean.
References in periodicals archive ?
As for the 'System Quality' dimension, it measured an arithmetic mean of (3.95) and a standard deviation of (0.57), which indicates that questionnaire respondents find the system quality high.
We also noticed that the arithmetic means in this area were significantly different between the groups of patients only in the second discriminant function.
Cooper (1996) found that even if returns are not independent over time and including possible estimation errors, the arithmetic mean is still the less biased estimator for the discount rate.
Unlike the geometric mean formula, the Laspeyres formula implemented in the CPI is an arithmetic mean of price relatives weighted by expenditures that implicitly contain information on quantity.
To determine whether the differences in arithmetic means are meaningful ANOVA was used and to determine the differences within the groups Scheffe test is utilized.
[H.sub.0]: We suppose that arithmetic mean of social network utilization frequency by finding new business contacts and job opportunities from the point of view of male is equal to arithmetic mean of social network utilization frequency by mentioned purpose from the point of view of female and at the same time we assume that the difference between them, if it exists, is caused only by coincident variation of selection results.
That difference can be decomposed (using a Taylor series evaluated at the expected values of wages) into the difference in the logs of the arithmetic means of wages [mu] and a remainder that depends on the variance [[mu].sub.2] and higher-order central moments:
The first method joins two projections along a selected latitude, the second method computes an arithmetic means of two projections, and the third method is a new approach to combine selected characteristics of two projections.
wheter the approximations are significantly better that the ones given by the geometric and arithmetic means. To learn that good approximation really makes the difference, consider Table 1, which shows the values of
as simple arithmetic mean of mobile averages, if the intervals between the moments are equal:
For [q.sub.2] > [q.sub.1], it follows that [bar.[q.sub.A]] > [bar.[q.sub.G]] > [bar.[q.sub.H]], where [bar.[q.sub.A]] is the arithmetic mean of the quantity; [bar.[q.sub.G]] is the geometric mean of the quantity; and [bar.[q.sub.H]] is the harmonic mean of the quantity.
Arithmetic mean of diameter I at differences process conditions and frozen layers thicknesses of 0.6 mm and 1.5 mm and a 95% CI for mean difference.