Argument

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Argument

On a computer, information that the user enters in response to the requirements of a program. The program can only continue to function once the user has entered the argument. This is common in spreadsheet programs.
References in periodicals archive ?
31) If the bar authority determines that an arguable question of professional duty exists, that the subordinate lawyer relied on a supervising lawyer's resolution of the question, and that such resolution was reasonable, the subordinate lawyer will be protected from professional discipline despite a determination that the course of conduct actually violated a professional rule.
2) My review is even more arguable when I praise and indeed celebrate what could be called chaos and anarchy in standards for college-level writing.
Accordingly, the uncontradicted evidence before the chambers judge was sufficient to meet the test of a good arguable case on damages at the service ex juris stage.
The Tax Division voluntarily adopted the RPOS standard in lieu of the old "reasonable basis" standard--an arguable position or colorable claim.
It is also arguable that the Clinton administration placed too much hope in the ability of Nelson Mandela's South Africa to act as as a regional force for good.
It is at least arguable," Sorin contends, "that without the East Europeans a viable, visible, distinctively Jewish culture would have become increasingly unlikely in America and might have disappeared.
It is arguable that the 'picture' he paints so vividly is really that of the 'mid-Victorian' period and not that of either the early decades or the last.
Reasonable basis exists if a position is arguable, even if it is likely to fail in the courts.
Levy also comments, "We have come to use the word |moot' to mean |not worth debating or discussing,' while the American Heritage Dictionary defines moot as |subject to debate, arguable.
The result: a partial and arguable picture of a breakthrough organism.
Against this background, it is arguable that the Commission's practice to date has given rise to the development of a unique supranational-type arbitration.
We are unpersuaded and find no arguable basis for granting permission to appeal.