Barrier

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Barrier

1. See: Trade barrier.

2. See: Barrier Option.
References in periodicals archive ?
Only about a third of ADA violations actually require structural changes or architectural barrier removal.
Remember that in existing buildings, it is necessary only to remove architectural barriers if it is "readily achievable," that is, "cheap and easy.
Foremost among these interventions are concerned with restructuring or altering the physical environment by removing or minimizing the effect of existing architectural barriers, thus providing accessibility to public buildings and other community facilities.
Throughout the past 25 years, many discriminatory policies, practices and barriers have been removed for people with disabilities as a result of requirements mandated by the ADA and other related laws, such as the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968 and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which covers federal employees and applicants with disabilities.
In 2006, former Chief Justice Fred Lewis ordered a statewide survey of all state court facilities to identify and eliminate architectural barriers confronting citizens with disabilities.
The Architectural Barriers Act Accessibility Guidelines for Outdoor Developed Areas (ABAG) are now the law for Federal lands as of November 26, 2013.
It also reflects the Americans with Disabilities Act and Architectural Barriers Act Accessibility Guidelines, and includes updates and additional information on topics like seismic detailing of ceiling systems and the Building Owners and Managers Association International standards for measuring space.
The issue of architectural barriers are very important for people with disabilities.
Guidelines to overcome architectural barriers in cultural heritage sites, by Maria Agostiano.
Access Board under the Architectural Barriers Act (ABA).
Guidelines; to overcome architectural barriers in cultural heritage sites.
The goal of the workshop was to begin the process of having low vision included in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) to allow equal access for the 38 million Americans age 40 and older with vision problems.

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