Barrier

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Barrier

1. See: Trade barrier.

2. See: Barrier Option.
References in periodicals archive ?
Only about a third of ADA violations actually require structural changes or architectural barrier removal.
Foremost among these interventions are concerned with restructuring or altering the physical environment by removing or minimizing the effect of existing architectural barriers, thus providing accessibility to public buildings and other community facilities.
Architectural barriers mean any obstacles in the building and its nearest vicinity that prevent or hinder free mobility of the disabled as a result of technical solutions, construction, or the conditions of use.
The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors of perception of architectural barriers for disabled customers, for example Siemianowice Silesian and the measurement of the level of quality in this regard.
Guidelines to overcome architectural barriers in cultural heritage sites, by Maria Agostiano.
These solutions are uniquely designed to help property owners overcome specific architectural barriers within the home, ensuring a more comfortable residential living experience.
Guidelines; to overcome architectural barriers in cultural heritage sites.
The construction of architectural barriers that are impermeable to radon is also recommended, above all in newly-built houses.
federal agency which develops minimum guidelines and requirements for standards issued under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Architectural Barriers Act, develops accessibility guidelines for telecommunications equipment and customer premises equipment under the Telecommunications Act, develops accessibility standards for electronic and information technology under Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, provides technical assistance on those guidelines and standards, and enforces the Architectural Barriers Act.
The new Architectural Barriers Act Accessibility Standard is a result of recent evaluation by the Washington, D.C.-based U.S.
A failure in Eugene risked condemning a generation of disabled Americans to the unequal treatment imposed by architectural barriers.
The Architectural Barriers Act of 1968 and the Mass Transportation Act of 1979 were among the earliest, but they were not fully implemented for many years.

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