apprenticeship


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Apprenticeship

A position in which one learns a trade or occupation by working directly under a skilled person. The student (called an apprentice) may be paid a small amount or may simply receive room and board.

apprenticeship

a form of TRAINING which involves workers committing themselves to one employer for a period of time during which they are to acquire the skills of the trade, mainly through informal instruction by those already skilled (supplemented by some college-provided tuition). Once trained in this way such workers have a set of recognized skills which can, in theory, lead to employment in any organization in the industry. The apprenticeship system has been much censured because it can transmit outdated skills, because competence is defined in terms of time served rather than skills acquired, and because it serves to limit the supply of skilled labour. The employer may not recoup the costs of an apprenticeship in the long run because the apprentice, once trained, may leave for alternative employment. The long-term decline in the apprenticeship system in the UK accelerated towards the end of the 1980s as government removed many of its statutory supports, e.g. by abolishing the Industry Training Boards (established in 1964) and removing the right of those remaining to levy ‘taxes’ on employers to support training. However, mounting alarm about skill shortages led to the apprenticeship system being revitalized in the mid-1990s as the modern apprenticeship. This new form of apprenticeship leads to a NATIONAL VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION, whilst progress during the apprenticeship is monitored more systematically (with reference to clear industry standards) than under the traditional system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chairman of DYW Lanarkshire and East Dunbartonshire, Ronnie Smith, said: "The DYW Regional Group for Lanarkshire and East Dunbartonshire is working closely with local stakeholders to promote Scottish Apprenticeship Week 2018.
He said that the move will enable the group to become a nationwide apprenticeship provider and support businesses across England thanks to its wide geographical scope.
A Degree Apprenticeship in Fire Scene Investigation is also being developed with Teesside University's School of Science & Engineering, supporting the creation of a brand new apprenticeship standard via a new Trailblazer group.
Tetlow outlined the value of apprenticeships to the engineering profession, as well as the need to embed professional registration into schemes.
* Ease apprenticeship tracking and reporting requirements for employers on public works projects, such as roads and schools.
For many of our people, an apprenticeship provides the first opportunity to gain experience and develop workplace skills.
Mr Boles added: "Businesses and colleges in Birmingham should be congratulated for helping apprenticeships move from strength to strength."
"People may have misconceptions that apprenticeships are just about industry or engineering, and maybe don't appreciate that for every type of occupation you can think of, there's an opportunity to do an apprenticeship in that sector."
The Portakabin Group's achievements have also been recognised and celebrated at the York Apprenticeship Awards, where the company won the 'Large Employer of the Year'category for the second consecutive year.
If you're interested in an apprenticeship, but need more skills and experience in order to get on to one, a traineeship could be for you.
C&K Careers currently have 150 apprenticeship vacancies on the website www.ckcareersonline.org.uk from companies across Calderdale and Kirklees.
With 10,000 needed this year, 9,500 will be enrolled on an apprenticeship scheme in one of 43 programmes ranging from chefs to fitters.