ARCH

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ARCH

Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity

A statistical measure of the average error between a best fit line and actual data that uses past data to predict future performance. General Autoaggressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity is the most common way of doing this. See also: Fractal Distribution.
References in periodicals archive ?
Computed tomography angiography revealed interruption of the aorta at the junction of the aortic arch and the descending aorta after the origin of left subclavian artery (Type A)(Figure-1).
The branching of the aortic arch in the Eurasian bittern (Botaurus stellaris, Linnaeus 1758).
Aortic arch anomalies have been classically explained by Edward's hypothetical double aortic arch and regression of its parts on right or left side leading to various combinations.
Finally, type A4 includes hypoplasia, coarctation, and atresia or absence of the aortic arch [3].
Inclusion criteria for control group were they had congenital or valvular heart disease required surgery and simultaneously they had symptomatic carotid artery stenosis (10 patient) documented by color Doppler sonography or had visible aortic arch plaque (45 patient) during coronary angiography .
Keywords: Aortic arch, fibrinolysis, thrombosis, newborn
Of these, 19 patients had poor apposition of the stent graft to the inner curve of the aortic arch.
Twelve (32%) patients had aortic arch hypoplasia proximal to the left subclavian artery.
Other aortic arch vessels showed no significant stenosis, but severe stenosis on ostioproximal subclavian artery remains after PTA (Figure 4), so stent implantation is proposed to patient as a definitive treatment option.
Long-term results of the frozen elephant trunk technique for extended aortic arch disease.
Their daughter was found to have an interrupted aortic arch, a very rare heart defect in which the aorta is not completely developed, and a ventricular septal defect in the wall dividing the left and right ventricles.