Resistance

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Resistance

An effective upper bound on prices achieved because of many willing sellers at that price level.

Resistance Level

In technical analysis, a price that a security does not, or only rarely, rise above. Technical analysts identify a resistance level by looking at past performance. When the security approaches the resistance level, it is seen as an indication to sell the security, which will increase the supply, causing the security's price to fall back below the resistance level. If there are too many buyers, however, the security rises above the resistance level. When this occurs, the price of the security will likely continue to rise until it finds another resistance level. It is also called the overhead resistance level. See also: Price ceiling, Support (Support level).

resistance

An increased supply of a security. Compare support.

Resistance.

Resistance, or resistance level, is the top of a stock's current trading range, and the point at which the price is higher than investors are willing to pay. As stockholders sell at resistance level, the stock price goes down because supply exceeds demand.

For example, if, on a repeated basis, as stock A's price reaches $60, stockholders begin to sell, then $60 is considered its resistance level. But a trading range isn't fixed and investor attitudes change, so the resistance level tends to move higher or lower over time.

If stock A rises to $63 without a surge of selling, the current resistance line has been breached. This may be the result of a rising market or a bullish assessment of the stock's value. On the other hand, if selling increases at $57, that may become the new resistance level.

Conversely, the level at which demand exceeds supply and investors typically buy a certain stock is called support. It's the point that's considered the bottom of a stock's current trading range.

Technical analysts use the concepts of resistance and support in anticipating future stock price movements.

References in periodicals archive ?
Levin, "Antiviral resistance and the control of pandemic influenza," PLoS Medicine, vol.
Since October 1, 2012, a total of 3,626 influenza virus specimens have been tested for antiviral resistance. All 961 influenza B viruses tested were sensitive to both oseltamivir and zanamivir.
Forty-four states submitted >20 specimens for antiviral resistance surveillance.
Frequent side effects reduce compliance and raise the risk of promoting antiviral resistance if lower drug concentrations only partly block virus replication, suggesting that governments in a disease containment mode not rely too much on antiviral drugs.
Antiviral resistance updates are available weekly at www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/fluactivity.htm.
Since September 30, 2012, a total of 205 influenza viruses have been tested for antiviral resistance. Of the two pH1N1, 122 influenza A(H3N2), and 81 influenza B viruses tested, all were sensitive to both oseltamivir and zanamivir.
Detection of antiviral resistance and genetic lineage markers in influenza B virus neuraminidase using pyrosequencing.
Since October 1, 2011, a total of 2,756 influenza virus specimens have been tested for antiviral resistance. All 317 influenza B viruses tested were sensitive to both oseltamivir and zanamivir.
Testing for antiviral resistance is needed, especially among this group, to ensure appropriate antiviral prescribing, minimize the risk for treatment failure, and minimize the risk of person-to-person transmission of a resistant strain.
Since October 1, 2011, a total of 426 influenza virus specimens have been tested for antiviral resistance. Of the 309 influenza A (H3N2), 71 pH1N1, and 46 influenza B virus specimens tested, 100% were sensitive to both oseltamivir and zanamivir.
We identified patients hospitalized in FluSurv-NET who had specimens submitted to national antiviral resistance surveillance by using Link Plus software to link antiviral resistance surveillance and FluSurv-NET data by patient county of residence, age, and sex and specimen collection date.
Since October 1, 2011, a total of 31 influenza viruses (five 2009 influenza A (H1N1), 24 influenza A (H3N2), and two influenza B viruses) have been tested for antiviral resistance. None of the tested viruses were found to be resistant to either oseltamivir or zanamivir.