Antitrust Law

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Antitrust Law

Any law opposing trusts, monopolies, and other organizations or practices deemed to be anti-competitive. Antitrust laws especially refer to laws forbidding price-fixing contracts, price discrimination, and tying. Proponents of antitrust laws believe they increase competition, while opponents, notably Ayn Rand, argue that they encourage economic inefficiency and punish success. See also: Sherman Act, Clayton Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
Louis convention, agricultural interests, organized through groups like the Grange and Farmers' Alliance, were major proponents of state antitrust legislation. In 1889, twelve states (nine from the Midwest) passed antitrust laws for the first time.[23] Seager and Gulick [1929] report that by 1890, twenty-seven states had antitrust restrictions, either through statute or constitutional provisions.
The government clearly had little or no interest in using antitrust legislation to promote competition.
(3) In this respect, the enactment of antitrust legislation would not make much difference in the absence of credible antitrust enforcement.
followed by antitrust legislation intended to preserve free competition
It is the first real attempt to harmonize preexisting antitrust legislation. It has also incorporated various improvements: namely, the increase of CADE's powers, particularly in relation to mergers, the amendment of the sanctioning provisions, and the promotion of CADE to an independent agency.
Subject to US Antitrust legislation clearance, the option to exercise the license triggers a milestone payment of USD50m and the total aggregate value of the license agreement is up to USD755m, plus royalties.
He championed economic reform, creating the Federal Reserve, backing antitrust legislation, and introducing a graduated income tax.
The idea that antitrust legislation and enforcement are necessary accommodations to public demand has a long pedigree in both conservative and more progressive circles.
"There was no 'dangerous concentration of wealth,'" DiLorenzo found, noting that the division of national income between labor and capital remained constant between 1840 and 1900, "but many supporters of antitrust legislation found that their own income had fallen (or not increased rapidly enough).
Although certainly a contested literature, the free-market opposition to antitrust legislation is far more sophisticated than Mallaby asserts (see, for instance, Fred S.
Arranza said enacting HB 4144 into law would be a violation of RA 10667 or the Philippine Competition Act, the first antitrust legislation in the country.