antitakeover measure


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Antitakeover Measure

Periodic or continual measures a firm's management takes to discourage unwanted or hostile takeovers. One example of an antitakeover measure is the macaroni defense, in which the company issues a large number of bonds with the proviso that they must be redeemed at a high price if the company is taken over. See also: Shark Watcher.

antitakeover measure

An action by a firm's management to block or halt a takeover by another party. Examples of antitakeover measures include a fairprice amendment, staggered terms of office for directors, and a requirement for an increased number of affirmative votes from shareholders to approve a takeover. See also show stopper.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Antitakeover Measures, Golden Parachutes, and Target Firm Shareholder Welfare." RAND Journal of Economics 21: 614-625.
Antitakeover measures, golden parachutes, and target firm shareholder interests.
Evidence on the deterrence and wealth effects of modem antitakeover measures. Journal of Financial Economics, 39: 3-43.
Evidence on the Deterrent and Wealth Effects of Modern Antitakeover Measures, Working Paper 4316.
It has already been suggested that antitakeover measures in general erode shareholder value.
said Thursday it fell into the red in fiscal 2007 through March 31 with a group net loss of 1.91 billion yen due to costs in adopting antitakeover measures against U.S.
1857, 1858-62 (2002) (examining the incidence of antitakeover measures in IPO firms).
Corporate-governance-related proposals received the strongest support, particularly those related to antitakeover measures, board pensions, and shareholder voting.
These firms, therefore, are more likely to adopt antitakeover measures, such as classified boards, than those that are not under-valued by the market (Davis, 1991).
The one substantive difference between Model #3 and Model #1 is that the coefficient for constituency statutes is now statistically significant in a positive direction, i.e., firms are more likely to incorporate in Delaware when their home state has a constituency statute, after controlling for the other antitakeover measures that the state has.
This same year, the board amended the corporation's bylaws and adopted antitakeover measures. In 1987, the year it acquired Kenner Parker, Tonka announced losses of $8 million.
Bull-Dog, which currently has no antitakeover measures, will propose the plan in the form of a special resolution at its general shareholders meeting, scheduled for June 24.