agent

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Agent

A party appointed to act on behalf of a principal entity or person. In context of project financing, refers to the bank in charge of administering the project financing.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Agent

A person who acts on behalf of an organization or another person. Agents have a fiduciary responsibility to act in the best interests of the principal. Common examples of agents include brokers and attorneys. See also: Agency theory, Agency problem, Agency costs.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

agent

An individual or organization that acts on behalf of and is subject to the control of another party. For example, in executing an order to buy or sell a security, a broker is acting as a customer's agent.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

Agent.

An agent is a person who acts on behalf of another person or institution in a transaction. For example, when you direct your stockbroker to buy or sell shares in your account, he or she is acting as your agent in the trade.

Agents work for either a set fee or a commission based on the size of the transaction and the type of product, or sometimes a combination of fee and commission.

Depending on the work a particular agent does, he or she may need to be certified, licensed, or registered by industry bodies or government regulators. For instance, insurance agents must be licensed in the state where they do business, and stockbrokers must pass licensing exams and be registered with NASD.

In a real estate transaction, a real estate agent represents the seller. That person may also be called a real estate broker or a Realtor if he or she is a member of the National Association of Realtors. A buyer may be represented by a buyer's agent.

Dictionary of Financial Terms. Copyright © 2008 Lightbulb Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the PRINCIPAL) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent generally has authority to act within broad limits in conducting business on behalf of his or her principal and has a basic duty to carry out the tasks involved with due skill and diligence.

An agent or broker acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding scale commission or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. A stockbroker, for example, acts on behalf of clients wishing to buy and sell financial securities; an estate agent acts as an intermediary between buyers and sellers of houses, offices, etc.; while an insurance broker negotiates insurance cover on behalf of clients with an insurance company. A recruitment agency performs the services of advertising for, interviewing and selecting employees on behalf of a company. In addition to the role of agents as market intermediaries, organizational theorists have paid particular attention to the internal relationship between the employees (‘agents’) and owners (‘principals’) of a company See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY.

Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the principal) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent thus acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding-scale commission, brokerage or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY for discussion of ownership and control issues as they affect the running of companies. See ESTATE AGENT, INSURANCE BROKER, STOCKBROKER, DIVORCE OF OWNERSHIP FROM CONTROL.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005

agent

One who acts on behalf of a principal in an agency relationship. See agency for an extended discussion.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Common contraindications of the rapid-acting antihypertensive agents Cautions Contraindications Nifedipine Hypertrophic obstructive Unstable angina, cardiomyopathy, aortic congestive heart failure, stenosis.
For patients who received multiple antihypertensive agents, stratification into a study group was determined by the agent that was administered first.
Importantly antihypertensive agents taken by the patients had no affect on the adverse event profile of sildenafil.
Our results apply to all patients prescribed antihypertensive agents, and although most had hypertension, there may be differences in first-fill rates for those with and without hypertension.
The route of the antihypertensive agent is determined by how fast the response is needed.
On the other hand, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), often used by elderly patients to treat osteoarthritis, may counter the effects of many antihypertensive agents. Both OTC and prescription NSAIDs inhibit cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the kidneys, resulting in a reduction in sodium excretion and an increase in plasma volume.
Thiazidetype diuretics are your standard initial therapy, but this patient has metabolic syndrome, and you know that certain antihypertensive agents have a more favorable metabolic profile than thiazide diuretics.
The change itself represents a significant reversal of long-standing belief in the value of beta-blockers as an antihypertensive agent. For each individual patient, the risk is not dramatic even though the cumulative "harm" from using a beta-blocker compared to other options is potentially staggering because so many people over 60 have hypertension.
Definitive evidence has demonstrated reduced risk of cardiovascular events with beta-blockers as a primary antihypertensive agent for patients with concurrent coronary heart disease.
It never gained broad use as an antihypertensive agent, and was prescribed mainly for hypertensive crises in paraplegics.
Calcium channel blocks as antihypertensive agents. Am J Med 1984; 77:135-42.