anomie

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anomie

a state of normlessness (i.e. a sense of confusion and loss about values and personal objectives) which French sociologist Emile Durkheim (1858-1917) believed could arise from the disruption of community caused by growing specialization in the division of labour. It could be expressed in job dissatisfaction and ‘deviant’ behaviour at work. The solution was to create a sense of community appropriate to the new division of labour. See ALIENATION, HUMAN RELATIONS, JOB SATISFACTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
When one wants to recover life, anarchy, anomy, and ademy in their truth, it is necessary therefore first to release oneself from the form that they have received in the exception.
Castle hotel guests believe that visiting and experiencing heritage locations can contribute to the reinforcement of national identity, which in turn can help build solid foundations for survival in times of anomy.
The hypotheses we intent to assume is that, in the circumstances of a world affected by globalisation, the risk of a generalised anomy following interpenetration between several cultures and traditions that assert multiple sides of the truth can only be tackled by a close correlation between knowledgement and the power exercise to assert the concise Imperative.
We estimate that this anomy and absurd sense emerge from an unsolved prolonged conflict between intangible social values and tangible economical values.
15) Soyinka pietism is unrealistic for the structural reorganization of the dysfunctional society in Season of Anomy.
Tariek' is closely related to 'deurmekaar' [crazy, confused, silly] and consequently-also connotes being mixed up and in a state of anomy.
For insight, she turns to the nonfiction and fiction of the Nigerian novelist and Nobel laureate Wole Soyinka, who in Season of Anomy underwrites the Western myth of Orpheus with the more collectively oriented and regenerative Yoruba myth of Ogun.
178), what in modern parlance we call anomy or lawlessness.
As there is a great number of "paid militant students" nowadays, an analysis of that decade is necessary in order to save those values as a way of solving the present terminal anomy.
Autonomy, Anomy, Integration and Anarchy: Advancing Educational Reforms and Policy in Israel Through Legislation and Court Rulings.
In his Season of Anomy (1973), Ofeyi falls short of the positive radical motivator of social change that she appears to be.
Benjamin's exception, in stark contrast, suspends the relationality between the law and its suspension in "a zone of anomy dominated by pure violence with no legal cover.