anomie


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anomie

a state of normlessness (i.e. a sense of confusion and loss about values and personal objectives) which French sociologist Emile Durkheim (1858-1917) believed could arise from the disruption of community caused by growing specialization in the division of labour. It could be expressed in job dissatisfaction and ‘deviant’ behaviour at work. The solution was to create a sense of community appropriate to the new division of labour. See ALIENATION, HUMAN RELATIONS, JOB SATISFACTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Merton's (1938) study of anomie concentrated on the socio-cultural sources of deviate behavior.
To understand this new narrative, it is therefore interesting to revisit the theory of social anomie, and especially the writings of Jean-Marie Guyau, an anarchy theorist for whom anomie could be defined as the morality of the future which would replace the universal, obligatory, and categorical law defended by Emmanuel Kant as the foundation of modern states.
Toward this end, we extend Merton's (1938) classic strain theory of anomie and its modern rendition, institutional anomie theory (Messner & Rosenfeld, 1997), to advance and test an institutional anomie theory of opportunity entrepreneurship (IATOE).
Many of the texts in this area of research are single case studies, such as Aceh or the Malukus, but Anomie and Violence joins a much smaller cluster of manuscripts which attempt to provide a rigorous comparative framework to explain the origins and resolution of the eight conflicts which erupted in Indonesia after the fall of Soeharto in 1998 (other examples include Jacques Bertrand's Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Indonesia [2004] and Gerry van Klinken's Communal Violence and Democratization in Indonesia: Small town wars [2007]).
As a contribution to this debate the remainder of this article reviews New Labour's impact on British democracy and argues that the party is suffering from constitutional anomie.
The sociology of the deviant: Anomie theory and beyond.
Their latest project is for a youth club in the small town of Akron where high school drop out rates, drug use and nowhere to go fuel a pervasive spirit of anomie and despair.
concludes, "we find not growing individualism, social anomie, and alienation, but the signs of individual participation in a varied but coherent public religious culture related to the public practice of religion" (118).
THE SPREAD-OUT, suburban, auto-centered way of life has been blamed for everything from anomie to obesity.
Society has since been overwhelmed by economic change leading to a new anomie in urban life and a lack of parental oversight, while Thais are taught about a cultural identity that does not correspond to everyday life.
Taking Edward Hopper's painting Nighthawks as an inspiration, Judith Jamison's Reminiscin', accompanied by love songs by famous female vocalists, proved an upbeat epilogue to an artwork usually invoking anomie and solitude.
The anomie during and following wars creates a spiritual sickness and longing that we all must find a path through.