anomie

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anomie

a state of normlessness (i.e. a sense of confusion and loss about values and personal objectives) which French sociologist Emile Durkheim (1858-1917) believed could arise from the disruption of community caused by growing specialization in the division of labour. It could be expressed in job dissatisfaction and ‘deviant’ behaviour at work. The solution was to create a sense of community appropriate to the new division of labour. See ALIENATION, HUMAN RELATIONS, JOB SATISFACTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Agamben's immediate gesture, once again, is to situate both law and logos in terms of a ground: 'That is to say, everything happens as if both law and logos needed an anomic (or alogical) zone of suspension in order to ground their reference to the world of life' (SE 60).
The advance of a becoming-animal will also see to the undoing of the alliance with the "anomic." This is its other anti-community gesture.
Because anomic neighborhoods have widespread crime and disorder and disconnected, frustrated, and fearful residents, they depend on the police for help.
materialist corruptions" and external influences and descends into "anomic cosmopolitanism" (129).
The Kingdom of Kasiah and Messiah Days are to have a full and coherent development then they will become anomic ideal societies since men will be perfect and they always will behave fairly.
Davenport and Davenport (1987) propose that two forms of suicide defined by Durkheim, altruistic and anomic, are most applicable to American Indians.
Sassower's endorsement of extreme autonomy, in the service of self-discovery, however, will result not in a functional "organized anarchy" (Cohen, March, & Olsen, 1972), but a disorganized, entropic, anomic, if not solipsistic, aggregate of individuals without community and hence without norms to guide their behavior.
How then did we develop this ideology of anomic individualism?
If, as argued above, no society is conceivable (in the long run) without social institutions; and if 'development' is interpreted as the disruptive, anomic and largely institution-free transition between relatively stable social orders; then it follows that 'development' is hardly sustainable.
A recent study by Mamuro Iga relies upon psychological and attitudinal survey data to argue that contemporary Japan displays high levels of altruistic, fatalistic, and anomic suicide.
The book presents the findings of the Anomie Research Project (ARP), a cross-cultural exploratory investigation of anomic structures.
Whether any of this constitutes poetic justice may be irrelevant to us, who live our lives in humdrum, anomic prose.