factor

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Factor

A financial institution that buys a firm's accounts receivable and collects the accounts.

Factor

A third party that buys a firm's accounts receivable. If a firm is not confident in its ability to collect on its credit sales, it may sell the right to receive payment to the factor at a discount. The factor then assumes the credit risk associated with the accounts receivable. This provides the firm immediate access to working capital, which is important, especially if the firm has a cash flow problem. The price of factoring is determined by the creditworthiness of the firm's customer, not of the firm itself. It is also known as accounts receivable financing.

factor

A firm that purchases accounts receivable from another firm at a discount. The purchasing firm then attempts to collect the receivables.

factor

To sell accounts receivable to another party at a discount from face value. Thus, a firm in need of cash to pay down short-term debt may decide to factor its accounts receivable to another firm.

factor

  1. a firm that purchases TRADE DEBTS from client firms. See FACTORING.
  2. a firm that buys in bulk and performs a WHOLESALING function.
  3. an input (for example raw material, labour, capital) which is used to produce a good or provide a service.

factor

  1. 1a FACTOR INPUT that is used in production (see NATURAL RESOURCES, LABOUR, CAPITAL).
  2. a business that buys in bulk and performs a WHOLESALING function.
  3. a business that buys trade debts from client firms (at some agreed price below the nominal value of the debts) and then arranges to recover them for itself. See FACTOR MARKET, FACTORING.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among these problems: artificially fabricated blood vessels do not readily branch out and network with host blood vessels, and blood vessels induced by angiogenic growth factors tend to be immature and "leaky.
This results in revascularization and microcirculatory improvement, including the production of angiogenic growth factors, enhanced new blood vessel formation (angiogenesis), and the subsequent regeneration of tissue such as skin, musculoskeletal and vascular structures.
This results in revascularization and microcirculatory improvement, including the production of angiogenic growth factors, enhanced new blood vessel formation (angiogenesis) and the subsequent regeneration of tissue such as skin, musculoskeletal and vascular structures.
Naked DNA delivery of angiogenic growth factors may be particularly attractive, since it provides prolonged production of the growth factor proteins at the site where they are needed, with a limited amount of protein escaping from that site.
Our factors appear to be exquisitely specific for endothelial cells in addition to being able to block activity to a variety of angiogenic growth factors without affecting other tissues.
Our work demonstrates that tumors require a regulated balance of angiogenic growth factors to create well-organized and well-functioning vessels, and that tumor vessels can be pushed to be abnormal and ultimately non-functional, to the point where they can interfere with tumor growth.