agent

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Agent

A party appointed to act on behalf of a principal entity or person. In context of project financing, refers to the bank in charge of administering the project financing.

Agent

A person who acts on behalf of an organization or another person. Agents have a fiduciary responsibility to act in the best interests of the principal. Common examples of agents include brokers and attorneys. See also: Agency theory, Agency problem, Agency costs.

agent

An individual or organization that acts on behalf of and is subject to the control of another party. For example, in executing an order to buy or sell a security, a broker is acting as a customer's agent.

Agent.

An agent is a person who acts on behalf of another person or institution in a transaction. For example, when you direct your stockbroker to buy or sell shares in your account, he or she is acting as your agent in the trade.

Agents work for either a set fee or a commission based on the size of the transaction and the type of product, or sometimes a combination of fee and commission.

Depending on the work a particular agent does, he or she may need to be certified, licensed, or registered by industry bodies or government regulators. For instance, insurance agents must be licensed in the state where they do business, and stockbrokers must pass licensing exams and be registered with NASD.

In a real estate transaction, a real estate agent represents the seller. That person may also be called a real estate broker or a Realtor if he or she is a member of the National Association of Realtors. A buyer may be represented by a buyer's agent.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the PRINCIPAL) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent generally has authority to act within broad limits in conducting business on behalf of his or her principal and has a basic duty to carry out the tasks involved with due skill and diligence.

An agent or broker acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding scale commission or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. A stockbroker, for example, acts on behalf of clients wishing to buy and sell financial securities; an estate agent acts as an intermediary between buyers and sellers of houses, offices, etc.; while an insurance broker negotiates insurance cover on behalf of clients with an insurance company. A recruitment agency performs the services of advertising for, interviewing and selecting employees on behalf of a company. In addition to the role of agents as market intermediaries, organizational theorists have paid particular attention to the internal relationship between the employees (‘agents’) and owners (‘principals’) of a company See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the principal) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent thus acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding-scale commission, brokerage or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY for discussion of ownership and control issues as they affect the running of companies. See ESTATE AGENT, INSURANCE BROKER, STOCKBROKER, DIVORCE OF OWNERSHIP FROM CONTROL.

agent

One who acts on behalf of a principal in an agency relationship. See agency for an extended discussion.

References in periodicals archive ?
Meperidine as a spinal anesthetic agent: a comparison with lidocaine-glucose.
Evaluation of three anesthetic agents for crayfish (Orconectesvirilis).
Ltd.) at 100mg/kg BW intravenously was used solely as anesthetic agent while in group F medetomidine HCl was used as prenesthetic and five minutes later anesthesia was induced with chloral hydrate.
The first most effective, safe and reliable intravenous anesthetic agent was thiopentone sodium.
Propofol and methohexital as anesthetic agents for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT): a comparison of seizure-quality measures and vital signs.
JHP will be responsible for manufacturing and supply of an injectable anesthetic agent.
* A VOLUME REFLECTOR[R] that replaces traditional bag-in-bottle and piston designs, and allows partial re-breathing of exhaled gases, has a small system volume with no moving parts, and delivers uninterrupted ventilation for a fast wash-in and wash-out of anesthetic agent.
Anesthesia is a broad discipline; for orthopaedic applications, the type and location of the planned orthopaedic procedure is important in the selection of the most appropriate anesthetic agent and technique.
Since the introduction of procaine (Novacain) in 1904, the search for an ideal local anesthetic agent has been ongoing.
Although CPT includes codes for injection into nerves [eg, 64430, Injection, anesthetic agent; pudendal nerve], lesions [eg, 11900, Injection, intralesional; up to and including seven lesions], and trigger-point muscles [eg, 20552, Injection(s); single or multiple trigger point(s), one or two muscle(s)], it appears that the local anesthetic you are injecting is being placed subcutaneously.
Although he had been exposed to isoflurane, an anesthetic agent that predisposes patients to malignant hyperthermia, initial signs of PRIS appeared on the third day following surgery, and the patient did not show all the signs and symptoms of malignant hyperthermia.