Analysis

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Analysis

The practice of examining information to determine what conclusions it indicates,. The information observed in analysis depends on the type of analysis being conducted. For example, technical analysis uses statistics to determine future price movements of securities, while fundamental analysis looks at indicators of a company's intrinsic value. Analysis may involve qualitative or quantitative information, or both. Most forms of analysis have both strengths and weaknesses.
References in periodicals archive ?
- Analyses to assess and help improve GPF data quality, timeliness and indicator classification
The analyses using the continuous measure of depressive symptoms revealed differences not detected with use of the categorical measure.
Analyses showed no difference in this outcome for the different counselors or types of contact (e.g., one-on-one contact vs.
1989)] and participated in planning and review of analyses, I withdrew from authorship because I could not concur with the manuscript, including the inferences drawn.
The paper by Anczkiewicz and Thirlwall is a technical paper dealing with improved analytical methods for preparing garnet for Sm-Nd analyses. The paper by Stowell and Tinkham provides a case study integrating geobarometric data with Sm-Nd garnet age dating in the Cordillera of western USA.
In part 1, "Add Muscle to What-If Analyses" (see JofA, Sept.04, page 38; www.aicpa.org/pubs/jofa/sep2004/weisel.htm), we demonstrated the basic techniques for managing multiple what-if versions using Excel's Scenario Manager.
Most sensitivity analyses that are conducted today are done on spreadsheets, but spreadsheets have their limitations.
In addition, traditional laboratory analyses are useful for special cause investigations--such as contaminant or damage/failure analysis--valuable to both supplier and paper maker," Hawes continued.
We run analyses with our 3D simulation on parts ranging from screwdriver handles to small connectors," Carobus says.
Readers need not get caught up in more-complicated analyses, such as significance testing, effect sizes, and even regression--statistical methods that Raymond and Hanushek criticize us for not using.
In the past, we have struggled first to apply the powerful and persuasive tools of class analysis to historicize race and gender, and in turn to persuade other scholars that class analyses failing to account for racial and gender formation remained impoverished and inadequate.