Amicus Curiae

(redirected from amicus curiae brief)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.
Related to amicus curiae brief: friend of the court, Friend of the court brief

Amicus Curiae

Latin for "friend of the court." A person who is not a party to a case but offers expert or other relevant information on a point of law in order to help the judge or jury make a decision. An amicus curiae may offer testimony (provided it is unsolicited by either party in the case) or write a brief or legal treatise on the matter at hand. The court has full discretion whether or not to accept the statement of an amicus curiae.
References in periodicals archive ?
et al" Assessing the Influence of Amicus Curiae Briefs on the Roberts Court (Annual Meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Working Paper, 2016) (on file with authors).
Under rule 8.520(f) of the California Rules of Court, the International Association of Defense Counsel (IADC) requests permission to file the attached amicus curiae brief in support of real party in interest Marshalls of CA, LLC.
amicus curiae brief in a procedural order released by the tribunal on 23
UMBRICHT, GEORG C., "An 'Amicus Curiae Brief' on Amicus Curiae Briefs at the WTO", Journal of International Economic Law, p.
(1.) The authors of this article submitted an amicus curiae brief in the case on behalf of former FDA officials in support of the Defendants-Appellees, Franck's Lab, Inc., et al., for affirmance of the district court's decision.
29, which concerns amicus curiae briefs, was amended in 2010 to add disclosure requirements concerning authorship and funding.
The American Psychiatric Association and the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law filed an amicus curiae brief supporting forcible administration of antipsychotic medication to the Tucson, Ariz., man who was charged with killing six people and wounding Rep.
An amicus curiae brief that brings to the attention of the Court relevant matter not already brought to its attention by the parties may be of considerable help to the Court.
In late August, the Natural Products Association (NPA), Washington, D.C., filed an amicus curiae brief in the U.S.
The court commented on the fact that the Florida Hospital Association had filed a Amicus Curiae brief in which it argued that the hospital's lien was not based on a private contract, but stemmed from a public pact with the hospital, which was required by federal law to provide emergency service.
In fact, there is such a mechanism available: the amicus curiae brief. Through this form of participation, non-parties to appeals are able to engage the court by submitting briefs as amicus curiae, or as a "friend of the court." (3) As of 1989, however, the court has been notably "friendless." (4)