process

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process

a flow of activities; a sequence of tasks.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, we determined the location of the IOF and its distance from two important anatomical structures, the IOM and the alveolar process of the maxilla in 51 human skulls from a gross anatomy laboratory.
In cases with bone loss, transplanted tooth can induce bone formation and reestablishment of alveolar process [6].
The first molar of the SD rats has five roots; the mesial root is the largest and is far from the other four roots, thus enabling clear evaluation of the modeling of the alveolar process around the mesial root.
"On the removal of a tooth under such circumstances (diseased), the root is found to be much blackened, irregular absorption has taken place on every part of it; and, generally, from the exposure of the root to the saliva, by the absorption of the alveolar process, it is covered with small scattered spots, of hard, dark-coloured tartar...
While the upper jaw presents an alveolar process wider than the basal bone, in the lower jaw it is the opposite.
Keywords: Direct trauma, Alveolar Process Bone Fracture, Immature Teeth.
The reticular pattern observed radiographically is often misinterpreted as diffuse fibrosis, peribronchial fibrosis, honeycombing, suspected bronchiectasis, pleural-pulmonary scarring, or diffuse cystic lung disease.(3) Sponge Lung is not specific for pulmonary edema and may represent any diffuse alveolar process superimposed on emphysema, including atypical infections, pulmonary hemorrhage, or non-cardiogenic causes of pulmonary edema.
It may occupies a position anywhere in mandible or maxilla but mostly the alveolar process of lower jaw is involved (Singh et al., 1993).
Patients with periodontitis of average degree of destruction have the destruction of bone tissue of alveolar process (often uniform) down to 1/2 of the roots of the teeth, the periodontal expansion cracks, and osteoporosis.
A 3D CT (bright speed 16 slice CT, GE Healthcare) of the mandible was done which revealed an irregular lytic lesion in the alveolar process of right side of mandible extending from lateral incisor to retromolar trigone (Figures 4(a) and 4(b)).
In this process hard dental tissues are replaced by the alveolar process bone, which is unfavorable and leads to ankylosis [15].