Aluminum

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Aluminum

The most abundant metal in the crust of the Earth. Because it is not very dense and is resistant to corrosion, it has a wide variety of commercial uses, notably in transportation, packaging, and construction. It is also used in home appliances. Aluminum is also spelled aluminium, especially in countries where British English predominates.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is generally assumed that aluminum hydroxide and aluminum hydroxide sucrose compounds are non-absorbable and safe.
* Aluminum hydroxide: alum (15%) and ammonia (28%);
The main basic materials as active ingredient of toothpaste is aluminum hydroxide for which the country still is entirely dependent on import as it not yet produced locally.
Specifically, the price for aluminum hydroxide is to be raised by US$90/m.t.
In terms of aluminum hydroxide production, the plant will be the biggest of its kind in Asia, and is anticipated to produce 550,000 tons per year.
"The only adjuvant currently licensed for use in humans is aluminum hydroxide," he says, "because it has such a long safety record.
When clarifier alum-bearing sludge is sufficiently acidified with sulfuric acid, insoluble aluminum hydroxide is dissolved and forms a dilute liquid alum.
1- adult vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis (whole virus, inactivated), a suspension for injection in a pre-filled syringe containing tick-borne encephalitis virus (neudrfl strain), adsorbed on hydrated aluminum hydroxide, propagated in chicken embryo fibroblasts (cef cells) ).
The term "chemical alumina" refers collectively to aluminum hydroxide and alumina for applications other than aluminum smelting.
The second group of additives included inorganic oxides and hydroxides: aluminum hydroxide (Al[(OH).sub.3]), titanium dioxide (Ti[O.sub.2]), fumed silica (Si[O.sub.2]) and zeolytes.
INCI name: titanium dioxide (and) aluminum hydroxide (and) stearic acid
(Aluminum hydroxide is a common antacid preparation given to dialysis patients to bind with, and thereby control, their body phosphate levels.) Bernard now suspects that the porphyrinopathy he's uncovered in these patients may be responsible for--and a potential biomarker of--the developing anemia so often observed in dialysis patients.