alley

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alley

A path between buildings or behind buildings, usually with walls on both sides.

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References in classic literature ?
For the side grounds, you are to fill them with variety of alleys, private, to give a full shade, some of them, wheresoever the sun be.
The two friends were crouching down, meantime, behind a tub in the side alley.
"So I see," said Sancho, "and God grant we may not light upon our graves; it is no good sign to find oneself wandering in a graveyard at this time of night; and that, after my telling your worship, if I don't mistake, that the house of this lady will be in an alley without an outlet."
The first day I worked in the bowling alley, the barkeeper, according to custom, called us boys up to have a drink after we had been setting up pins for several hours.
Several times De Vac paced the length of this black alley in search of the little doorway of the building he sought.
When I left the hut, I had felt that she and I were safe among friends; no thought of danger was in my mind; but since my audience with Al-tan, the presence and bearing of Duseen and the strange attitude of both To-mar and Chal-az had each contributed toward arousing my suspicions, and now I ran along the narrow, winding alleys of the Kro-lu village with my heart fairly in my mouth.
The streets and alleys were short and crooked and there were many areas where buildings had been wedged in so closely that no light could possibly reach the lowest tiers, the entire surface of the ground being packed solidly with them.
The little champion of Rum Alley stumbled precipitately down the other side.
I fancy the yew alley, though not marked under that name, must stretch along this line, with the moor, as you perceive, upon the right of it.
Next, he saw a narrow alley, between ramshackle frame buildings.
"Her father shall pay me for it doubly: with his purse and with his life." With that thought in his heart, Richard Turlington wound his way through the streets by the river-side, and stopped at a blind alley called Green Anchor Lane, infamous to this day as the chosen resort of the most abandoned wretches whom London can produce.
"The alley back of Campbell's grocery," Billy elucidated.