Alien

(redirected from alienness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Alien

A non-citizen. An alien is a citizen of a state other than the one in which he/she resides, works, and/or visits. Aliens usually have restrictions on working in other countries. Many countries also have restrictions on how much investment or ownership of property aliens are allowed to have. A few countries forbid foreign investment entirely, though many encourage investment by aliens as it brings capital into the countries.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perez-Torres' analysis of the novel form, in particular, supports my claims about the failure of pan-Puerto Rican alliance in light of the hierarchy of differences outlined in the Bodega Dreams: "Within a Latino context, this disjuncture manifests itself along numerous lines of rupture having to do with ethnicity, identity, affirmation and interrogation of tradition, the assertion of citizenship, an imposition of 'alienness' and the vagaries and delimitation of class identity, all negotiated through the creative self-destruction of the novel form" (Perez-Torres 2000: 548).
The occasional anthropomorphization of gauna in effect plays up not only their utter alienness, but at the same time something inhuman at the heart of humanity itself (Fig.
Already at the beginning of the document, the importance of the "alienness" of other religions is emphasized.
Moreover, action and judgment share in their fundamental groundlessness a constitutive alienness to the concept, to that which can be identified in advance.
If "truth appears as we stumble," (9) then it is knowing that makes us stumble, knowing in conversation with the unknown, the uneven footpaths where we trip over novelty for its glorious alienness, the meeting of entities drawing crevasses as they come together to catch our shoes: our unsteadiness for the way we marvel at the newness, at the revelations of a thing now known amidst all the vast inscrutability, all the more fathomless the further the comprehensible extends.
Strangely, the Quraysh themselves do not seem to have protested that label, so for them the words "foreign" and "Persian" probably did not reference the alienness and contamination of these ideas.
Working with British Gothic materials took Harby from America to the historically and geographically remote locale of sixteenth-century Florence, and it provided villains whose alienness was likewise at a far remove from his own.
I think the alienness of that underwater world prevents us from appreciating what we are doing to the oceans, which is in some ways even more serious than what we are doing to the land.
And once their native country became the enemy, the exoticism and "alienness" of these Japanese faces were sufficient to justify their punishment and removal under the pretext of national security.
Coetzee has referred to these problematic early linguistic experiences--"as a child from an Afrikaans background attending English-medium classes, at a time of raging Afrikaner nationalism, a time when laws were being concocted to prevent people of Afrikaans descent from bringing up their children to speak English"--as central to his development of a feeling of linguistic and cultural "alienness" (1992a: 393).
The alienness of all the world to the experience of an individual that needs to be transcended is signalled by what arguably is the benchmark for masculine heroism for Bombay cinema--the character of Devdas, the central protagonist of Sarat Chandra Chatterjee's eponymous novel that has been adapted to screen time and again in Bombay film history.
It leads back to basic experiences of welcoming in a context of globalization where the experience of alienness has become rare.