Alien

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Related to alienage: ghetto, 14th Amendment

Alien

A non-citizen. An alien is a citizen of a state other than the one in which he/she resides, works, and/or visits. Aliens usually have restrictions on working in other countries. Many countries also have restrictions on how much investment or ownership of property aliens are allowed to have. A few countries forbid foreign investment entirely, though many encourage investment by aliens as it brings capital into the countries.
References in periodicals archive ?
These cases train the inquiry on how alienage influences personal jurisdiction under the Due Process Clauses.
[section] 1240.8(c) (2014) ("In the case of a respondent charged as being in the United States without being admitted or paroled, the Service must first establish the alienage of the respondent.").
After Plyler, it became clear that alienage did not always rise to the level of strict scrutiny.
(124) Alienage laws, including existing state laws that regulate
(20) Saskia Sassen, "The Repositioning of Citizenship and Alienage: Emergent Subjects and Spaces for Politics" in Globalizations vol.
(7.) Visible whiteness is not enough by itself to signify alienage or even immigrant status.
Supreme Court has held that state laws which discriminate based on alienage or length of in-state residency are in violation of the Fourteenth Amendment's Equal Protection Clause, the same does not necessarily hold true for federal laws.
A classification by race or alienage, however, raises the suspicion that the classification is arbitrary.
It is true that even though the alienage jurisdiction statute creates federal subject matter jurisdiction, (62) courts nonetheless use forum non conveniens to dismiss those types of suits.
In Linda Bosniak's terms, the conjoined statuses of the "alienage of the citizen," who due to the salmagundi status of gay marriage in the U.S., is not completely "out" of citizenship and the "citizenship of the alien," who is not completely "in," reveal the compounded vulnerability of this new "class of persons," a subject whose "right to have rights" is contingent upon those of her partner.
alienage, (139) is typically regarded as the "high-water mark of