Al Qaida

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Al Qaida

A terrorist organization founded in the late 1980s. It was established in Pakistan to fight against the Soviets in Afghanistan. Its ideology is based on a certain interpretation of the writings of Sayid Qutb, who argued that "true" Islam had been lost over the years and has to be recovered. It is best known for the 9/11 terrorist attacks, which, among other things, destroyed the World Trade Center in the United States and served as the impetus for subsequent American wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Since 2001, Al Qaida has become more decentralized, with various otherwise unrelated groups claiming the name as they conduct terrorist or other activities in different countries.
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Al-Qaeda is known to have operated a training camp in Bermal until it was raided by US forces in the summer of 2015.
has been published in a special edition of the Combating Terrorism Centre (CTC) Sentinel, a publication of the US military academic institution, analyzing al-Qaeda over the past 16 years since 9/11, which shows the global terror group's presence in the city has been growing in recent years.
Yet, some experts believe that ISIL Spokesman Abu Mohammad al-Adnani's verbal attack against al-Qaeda leaders in the past was the main starting point of the current exacerbated tensions between the two groups.
He said Al-Qaeda and Daish would not be allowed to get roots in Balochistan.
He mediated with Iranian authorities as of early 2015, Treasury said, and helped Al-Qaeda members living in Iran.
The al-Qaeda strategy of franchising has been organized as a two-tier structure with a central command (often called "al-Qaeda central" by both organization leaders and the media) and various subordinate branches, each of which is responsible for a particular geographical region.
By appointing a caliph, ISIL has declared that it no longer recognizes the global authority of al-Qaeda.
We also have found three mass graves in Al-Mahfad district of Abyan where it's believed that Al-Qaeda members were buried but we don't know the exact number.
Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi's return in Al-Qaeda is not imminent and his group has become a challenge for Al-Qaeda.
Al-Qaeda fears that the indiscriminate slaughter of fellow Muslims will alienate supporters.
Despite these successes, "the recent global terror alert illustrates that, 15 years after its first attacks on America, Al-Qaeda is thriving," former CIA analyst Bruce Riedel wrote in a recent opinion piece.
Five Al-Qaeda members were killed in the raid" that targeted a house in the village of Al-Ain in Hadramawt province, the official said, requesting anonymity.