exposure

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Risk

The uncertainty associated with any investment. That is, risk is the possibility that the actual return on an investment will be different from its expected return. A vitally important concept in finance is the idea that an investment that carries a higher risk has the potential of a higher return. For example, a zero-risk investment, such as a U.S. Treasury security, has a low rate of return, while a stock in a start-up has the potential to make an investor very wealthy, but also the potential to lose one's entire investment. Certain types of risk are easier to quantify than others. To the extent that risk is quantifiable, it is generally calculated as the standard deviation on an investment's average return.

exposure

see EXCHANGE RATE EXPOSURE.

exposure

(1) In finance,the amount that one may lose in an investment;the potential loss,which could be the capital invested plus any personal liability on loans in excess of the value of the property securing the loans. (2) In the market, the process of making a property known to the marketplace as available for sale or lease.(3) Physically, the direction of an improvement;for example,“The southern exposure of the house had all the best views.”

References in periodicals archive ?
Twelve, 701 plastic rectangular containers from each tank were randomly placed into 1-ton indoor fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) tank and three 1-ton FRP tanks were used for stress resistance of abalone subjected to the various stress conditions (air exposure, sudden low salinity, and high temperature changes).
The data on the chemical composition during air exposure in non-fermented and fermented TMR were analyzed by using the general linear model procedure, and the fixed effects were moisture level, air exposure time, and the interaction between moisture level and exposure time:
These findings suggest that peritoneal air exposure may induce intestinal inflammation and play an important role in the development and progression of POI.
Thirty rats were randomly divided into five groups (n = 6 each): a control group, a sham group, and three exposure groups with peritoneal air exposure for 1, 2, and 3 h, respectively.
Measured pyrene concentration in the PAH exposure group averaged higher than that in normal air exposure group (P < 0.005, two-tailed f-test).
Holly Loretz and colleagues, from the Centre for Contact Lens Research at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, used a 'custom-designed model blink cell' to analyse the impact of intermittent air exposure on lipid (fatty) deposits on various contact lens materials.
The validity of these epidemiologic observations has been supported by the results of controlled experimental ozone exposures in human volunteers in which markers of asthma status were measured after ozone and after clean air exposures. In these studies, ozone has been demonstrated to worsen airway inflammation, to increase the airway response to inhaled allergen, and to increase nonspecific airway responsiveness, each of which is likely to indicate worsening asthma.
(7.) Ong KJ, Stevens ED and Wright PA: Gill morphology of the mangrove killifish {Krvptolebias marmoratus) is plastic and changes in response to terrestrial air exposure. J Exp Biol 210: 1109-1115, 2007.
Just speaking of air exposure, and there are scientific papers on this, if you release one molecule of toluene, at three metres above the ground, into a six kilometre wind, that molecule, uninterrupted, will travel 34 kilometres."
The dispensing system protects products from the harmful effects of longterm air exposure, including contamination, discoloration, and product dry-out, while helping to increase product shelf life and effectiveness.
Crabs, shrimps, and lobsters are discarded in high proportions in relation to landings in both the directed fisheries for crustaceans and in the prosecution of finfish fishing (Cook, 2003), and many of those discards die from stressors including physical injuries to the carapace, lost and broken limbs, and physiological stress associated with temperature changes and air exposure.
The dispensing mechanism protects the product from the harmful effects of long-term air exposure, including contamination, discoloration and product dry-out and ultimately increases product shelf life and effectiveness.