Agriculture

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Agriculture

The production of food through the raising of crops and/or animals. The development of agriculture approximately 9,000 years ago is considered to be one of the most important revolutions in human thinking, one that made civilization possible. The trade of agricultural products, such as wheat or coffee, gave rise to the first exchanges. Even now, agricultural products are among the most important commodities that are traded. Very often, agriculture may only be performed in certain areas. Zoning laws regulate where farming and ranching may or may not take place. See also: Agribusiness.
References in periodicals archive ?
The measure mandates the DAR, in coordination with the Landbank of the Philippines, to submit to the Department of Agriculture (DA) within 30 days from the effectivity of the Act the complete list of qualified agrarian reform beneficiaries and leaseholders to be included in the Registry System for Basic Sectors in Agriculture (RSBSA), their respective locations and size of landholdings.
Considering especially the phenomenology of darkness--a subject reflecting Scott's expansion of the scope of the agrarian in generative ways--the chapter traces the ways the Macbeths seek to separate human agency from the reception of an external nature of biological determinism.
This is an important achievement, and one that should motivate further work, of all kinds, between the literatures and scholars marshalled by Thompson in The Agrarian Vision and the literatures and scholars of environmental justice.
After elevating their complaint to the department of agrarian reform in 2003, seven farm workers were killed and dozens were injured during a strike at the Hacienda in 2004.
In recent years there has been persisting talk of a unification of the Bulgarian agrarian movement, but no results have been achieved this far.
Ben Holmes, the 47-year-old founder and director of the Farm School in Athol, Massachusetts, says that he sees a real difference between the agrarian spirits of 25 years ago and the aspiring farmers of today.
Reciprocity was the key factor in these pre-modern agrarian societies that required participation and cooperation for their survival.
This typology was used to examine perceptions and interactions between two central groups in the six agrarian towns, the oldtimers and the newcomers.
The New Agrarian Mind: The Movement Toward Decentralist Thought in Twentieth-Century America, by Allan Carlson, New Brunswick, N.
For decades, I'll Take My Stand: The South and the Agrarian Tradition (1930) has been not only the Agrarians' most (in)famous manifesto but also the only example of their thought easily available and regularly studied in universities.
In the literal sense, it is the ability to sustain an agrarian culture.