Agriculture

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Agriculture

The production of food through the raising of crops and/or animals. The development of agriculture approximately 9,000 years ago is considered to be one of the most important revolutions in human thinking, one that made civilization possible. The trade of agricultural products, such as wheat or coffee, gave rise to the first exchanges. Even now, agricultural products are among the most important commodities that are traded. Very often, agriculture may only be performed in certain areas. Zoning laws regulate where farming and ranching may or may not take place. See also: Agribusiness.
References in periodicals archive ?
The farmers said they were unaware of the prohibition in the agrarian reform law on leasing or selling land that had been given to them.
The Department of Agrarian Reform hoped to distribute 12,392 hectares of that land that year.
After elevating their complaint to the department of agrarian reform in 2003, seven farm workers were killed and dozens were injured during a strike at the Hacienda in 2004.
The recent history of Bulgaria's agrarian parties has been marked by progressing fragmentation and marginalization, with Lichev splitting from right-leaning Bulgarian Agrarian People's Union led by Anastasia Mozer in 2006.
The author counters arguments about the inefficiency of communal agrarian hegemony, by pointing out dynamic economic life in autonomous municipalities by which municipal councils transformed the commons into corporate assets.
Salamon presents a clear discussion of the community ethnographic approach, the factors resulting in the selection of the six agrarian towns, and conceptualizes important terms used in her argument which include town, community, neighborhood and the post-agrarian social fabric.
In The New Agrarian Mind, Allan Carlson, who has written prolifically and with insight on issues relating to the family, surveys a series of agrarian thinkers spanning the twentieth century, beginning with Liberty Hyde Bailey and concluding with present-day author Wendell Berry.
In a very basic sense, an agrarian system provides the resources needed to meet basic human needs of food and shelter while protecting air, soil, and water.
In examining the work of Allan Tate, Donald Davidson, John Crowe Ransom, Robert Penn Warren, and others who contributed to the classic statement of the southern agrarian position, I'll Take My Stand (1930), Duncan argues that they provide a useful alternative vision of American political and social life.
Academic and policy literature is replete with accounts of failure and cynical symbolic manipulation in the field of agrarian reforms.