aging


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Related to aging: Aging process

Aging

The process of investigating a company's accounts receivable according to how long individual invoices have been outstanding. Analysts can use aging to identify bad debt and/or problems with the company's credit policy.

aging

A technique for evaluating the composition of a firm's accounts receivables to determine whether irregularities exist. It is carried out by grouping a firm's accounts receivables according to the length of time accounts have been outstanding. For example, a financial analyst may use aging to determine whether a firm carries many overdue debtors that may never pay their bills.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vladimir Dilman, the founder of neuroendocrine theory of aging, and Prof..
"Declining proliferation is a cause of mammalian aging," says Sharpless.
Asia's four biggest economies--Australia, China, Japan, and South Korea--are all affected by the aging phenomenon.
But as aging in place becomes a dominant trend within an IL community, practical, effective and consistent responses to this dilemma often elude even the most experienced and innovative sponsors and owner/operators.
He argues that we should address male-specific factors in the aging process including health and relationship issues.
The EPA will be using this information to help formulate its National Agenda on the Environment and Aging. A draft agenda should be available for public comment in January 2004, and the final document should be complete by fall 2004.
While all elderly people experience losses, depression is not a normal part of aging anymore than it is at any age.
Along with meeting their senior mentors, they spend eight weeks analyzing geriatric case studies under the guidance of docents (practicing physician volunteers), exploring how aging impacts on health issues such as nutrition, exercise, mental outlook, and socialization.
Her English experts of the 1930s, especially among eugenicists, contributed to alarm over demographic aging, a situation Patrice Bourdelais discovered in France at the same time.
The free-radical theory of aging is based on the hypothesis that the endogenous build-up of free-radical species results in oxidative molecular damage.
In a review article, The American Running Association's own Editorial Board Members Lewis Maharam, M.D., and Stephen Perle, D.C., found that while certain effects of aging (such as a decrease in maximum heart rate, decrease in maximum aerobic capacity, slower recovery, and yes, declines in performance) may be inevitable--the rate of decline can be modified by training.