Aggregation

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Aggregation

Process in corporate financial planning whereby the smaller investment proposals of each of the firm's operational units are aggregated and effectively treated as a whole.

Aggregation

1. A composite report of all futures positions held by a single trader. Aggregations are used to ensure that reports are accurate and regulations are followed.

2. In corporate financial planning, the combination of several, small investments such that they are treated as one, large investment.
References in periodicals archive ?
How clustering of business activities, that is, the development of industrial zones which is widely recognised as the agglomeration, will affect the social inclusion is an important point of concern among the civil society, academics and applied researchers but yet needed to explore through a strong micro-founded evidence.
2.1 Industry Agglomeration and Profitability of Foreign Subsidiaries in an Emerging Economy
In previous literature, the link between spatial concentration of employment and agglomeration economics is ignored but agglomeration economics plays a vital role in employment.
Based on this, by studying the relationship between the transport supply structure and transport demand structure of urban agglomeration, the discriminant model of transport supply-demand equilibrium of urban agglomeration is built in this paper which can quantitatively evaluate the development degree and the equilibrium state of urban agglomeration transport supply-demand structure.
Industrialization and agglomeration is accompanied by urbanization because many efficiencies and external economies are obtained by an industry located near others.
* Space character: The movement of financial agglomeration is in line with the way of thinking of the "financial geography", and the operation mode is from the spatial difference to the spatial process and then to the spatial interaction".
There are potentially significant benefits from agglomeration. As such, our findings from the Learning to Compete (L2C) project (/node/388) suggest that there are many emerging sectors in Africa (e.g., traded services, agro-processing) that could benefit from the establishment of effective, well-functioning industrial clusters in the form of, for example, special economic zones (SEZs).
We investigate agglomeration while examining the relationship between employment density and labor productivity in Japan.
A few years later, with Martin and Ottaviano (1999), Fujita and Thisse (2002) and Baldwin and Martin (2004) explain the phenomena of urban agglomeration on economic growth.
Des responsables au ministere ont fait savoir que ces nouvelles agglomerations seront baties avec la participation des unions agricoles, productives et consommatrices, ainsi que celles de la richesse piscicole.
Have a material that you're interested in testing for agglomeration feasibility?
Crozet, Mayer and Muchielli (2004), Head, Ries and Swenson (1995, 1999), and Hilber and Voicu (2010), the analysis takes great care in identifying the effects of agglomeration economies on FDI location.