agent

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Related to agentive: agentive role

Agent

A party appointed to act on behalf of a principal entity or person. In context of project financing, refers to the bank in charge of administering the project financing.

Agent

A person who acts on behalf of an organization or another person. Agents have a fiduciary responsibility to act in the best interests of the principal. Common examples of agents include brokers and attorneys. See also: Agency theory, Agency problem, Agency costs.

agent

An individual or organization that acts on behalf of and is subject to the control of another party. For example, in executing an order to buy or sell a security, a broker is acting as a customer's agent.

Agent.

An agent is a person who acts on behalf of another person or institution in a transaction. For example, when you direct your stockbroker to buy or sell shares in your account, he or she is acting as your agent in the trade.

Agents work for either a set fee or a commission based on the size of the transaction and the type of product, or sometimes a combination of fee and commission.

Depending on the work a particular agent does, he or she may need to be certified, licensed, or registered by industry bodies or government regulators. For instance, insurance agents must be licensed in the state where they do business, and stockbrokers must pass licensing exams and be registered with NASD.

In a real estate transaction, a real estate agent represents the seller. That person may also be called a real estate broker or a Realtor if he or she is a member of the National Association of Realtors. A buyer may be represented by a buyer's agent.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the PRINCIPAL) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent generally has authority to act within broad limits in conducting business on behalf of his or her principal and has a basic duty to carry out the tasks involved with due skill and diligence.

An agent or broker acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding scale commission or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. A stockbroker, for example, acts on behalf of clients wishing to buy and sell financial securities; an estate agent acts as an intermediary between buyers and sellers of houses, offices, etc.; while an insurance broker negotiates insurance cover on behalf of clients with an insurance company. A recruitment agency performs the services of advertising for, interviewing and selecting employees on behalf of a company. In addition to the role of agents as market intermediaries, organizational theorists have paid particular attention to the internal relationship between the employees (‘agents’) and owners (‘principals’) of a company See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the principal) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent thus acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding-scale commission, brokerage or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY for discussion of ownership and control issues as they affect the running of companies. See ESTATE AGENT, INSURANCE BROKER, STOCKBROKER, DIVORCE OF OWNERSHIP FROM CONTROL.

agent

One who acts on behalf of a principal in an agency relationship. See agency for an extended discussion.

References in periodicals archive ?
Rainer (2015: 1313) first explains that Latin -tor originally was limited to an agentive meaning.
Whereas Shahraz's Bano, rather than being helpless and dependent, becomes an agentive woman in self-assertingly facing the challenges posed by patriarchal structures within private and public domains, Khan's Trespassing debunks any essentialist and absolute constructions of South Asian women in an urban context through the characters of Dia and her Western-educated mother Riffat, a successful entrepreneur and an activist.
Against the background of economic crises and the uncertainty of market forces, on the one hand, and the unpredictability of urban planners' and local authorities' decision-making processes on the other, city residents, traders and market employees still rely on the agentive forces of spirits to prevent their trading places and livelihoods from being destroyed.
As a result, vital, agentive aspects of the self become abandoned sites for generating experience that go unrecognised and are quickly covered up by attacks on the self, object and any signs of spontaneous, creative, productions.
Stories and storytelling point not only to what young people value in their moral worlds but also to their agentive capacities to create and sustain themselves within those worlds.
He argues that "arguments may have different 'degrees of membership' in a role type" (1991: 571); in other words, some arguments of verbs are more agentive than others, depending on how many and what kind of properties from those listed above they exhibit.
Gonzales Rey further elaborates this by saying that "Stetsenko conceptualise human subjectivity as an agentive and inherently necessary moment within unfolding activity processes.
For teacher preparation for inclusive education to be responsive to this process, it needs to recognize that teachers' capacity to be agentive does not flow spontaneously from acknowledging the social origins of schooling phenomena.
The aim of this dovetailed approach is to demonstrate that the grammaticalization pathways and functions of agentive marking observed in natural languages are replicated by the grammaticalization of case marking in the artificial language of the computer simulation, and to show that the findings have theoretical implications for our understanding of how core case-marking patterns evolve.
That is one of the key reasons why anti-intellectualism does not sufficiently account for agentive control.
There is an agentive certainty that the authors maintain, nurturing a meaningful conversation and doing so through the online electronic technologies they critique (recall the early morning emails).
A third fact that would explain the lower frequency of demonstratives in Latin in relation to Romance languages is related to the expression of the function of agentive, presented in L mainly through present participle (PrP).